Posts Tagged: granta

Profile of “Pangaeic” Writer David Mitchell

By

Fans of Cloud Atlas, a sextet of sweeping stylistic range, know well that Granta-recognized author David Mitchell has a knack for mimesis. But they may not know that he is also “uncommonly good at imitating nonhuman noises.” In anticipation of his new “psychovoltaic” novel, The Bone Clocks, Catherine Schultz walks with him through the Irish countryside as he discusses turning young adult “stew” into serious literature, dropping coins into the “slot called plot,” and writing using Google Maps.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

The news of Michael Brown’s death cannot be ignored. When one of our young people dies from shots fired by a police officer, there will be sadness and confusion. There will inevitably be questions, and questions left unanswered will lead to anger.  This is a week, perhaps, when we need fiction and art to help us try to make sense of who we are and where we go from here.

...more

Interrogating Adrian

By

Over at Granta, Francisco Vilhena interviews Adrian Tomine, the artist and illustrator responsible for bringing us Shortcomings, Summer Blonde, and any number of illustrations for the New Yorker. Tomine riffs on the origins of his stories, landing a job in pre-9/11, and the dynamics of imperfection:

I’ve heard people mention – and sometimes criticize – this unresolved quality in my stories.

...more

“Firecrackers and Wedding Music”

By

Granta has a stirring excerpt from Maria Choudhuri’s forthcoming memoir Beloved Strangers, about growing up in the capital of Bangladesh and then moving to New York.

The excerpt starts to explore the topic of her parents’ arranged marriage and what it meant for her mother to trade in a music career for a domestic life in a new town full of Pakistani soldiers.

...more

Notable NYC: 11/9–11/15

By

Saturday 11/9: The Comic Arts Festival features guest speakers, indie publishers, and self-published comic zines. Mt. Carmel Church -and- The Knitting Factory, 11am to 7pm, free.

Colum McCann reads from his novel Transatlantic (June 2013), presented by Community Bookstore. Brooklyn Public LIbrary, 4pm, free.

...more

The dark side of criticism

By

“At eleven, I felt that I might actually play anything on this violin,” writes Catherine Tice, the daughter of two musicians. Her essay in Granta, “A Brief History of Musical Failure,” raises the question of what it means to have “the makings of a prodigy,” and whether, in order to succeed, one must be immune “to the dark side of self-criticism.”

Still, Tice believes that she almost “gave [herself] over to the violin completely.”

...more

Teju Cole on Lagos

By

When I’m in the US, I argue with those who think Lagos is too dangerous a place to visit….I’m less defensive about Lagos when I’m actually there. After a few days back home, I begin to accumulate irritations and fears…The city makes everyone tense and grouchy.

...more

Making VIDA Count

By

We reached out to several of the worst offenders to ask where they thought they had gone wrong…but got very little in the way of responses. So we decided, instead, to reach out to the editors of the publications that actually had managed to show a relatively gender-equitable byline distribution in 2012.

...more

Transcendent Passes

By

Aleksandar Hemon writes about finding a way to play soccer after moving to the States, the characters on his team, and most importantly, this:

“…The moment of transcendence that might be familiar to those who practise sports with other people; the moment, arising from the chaos of the game, when all your team mates occupy the ideal position on the field; the moment when the universe seems to be arranged by a meaningful will that is not yours; the moment that perishes – as moments tend to – when you complete the pass; and all you have left is a vague, physical, orgasmic memory of the instant you were completely connected with the world around you.”

...more

Notable New York, This Week 5/10 – 5/16

By

This week in New  York, Granta’s Sex Party, The Moth Mainstage presents Saints and Sinners, SLEIGH BELLS perform, Emily Gould celebrates her new memoir with a party, Sebastian Junger discusses his latest work, Chip Kidd, The Thing Quarterly presents issue 10 with Starlee Kine and Arthur Jones, Eteam in a group show Resurrectine and Jonathan Horowitz’s exhibit “Go Vegan!” returns.

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

The books blogs always like to talk about the future, but this week was like some sort of official book blog crystal ball week, what with this new decade they tell me we’re in now and everything.

We’ve already linked to Richard Nash’s take on the next ten years, but the NBCC’s Critical Mass has lots of different perspectives.

...more

A Call for the Rebirth of Literary Magazines

By

“. . . This is a critical time not just for Granta but also for the future of the literary journal as an art form. It is no longer enough for a literary magazine to publish ‘good writing,’ or even ‘new writing.’ We’ve got the Internet now.”

So says Dan Crowe in his article “Publish and Be Damned,” which is part review of the 100th issue of Granta, a British “magazine of new writing,” and part call for a literary revolution.

...more