Posts Tagged: grief

Visible: Women Writers of Color #5: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Truth About Lying

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My gut is a red, fiery drum, a beacon of rosy light. My instinct to run is a bright radioactive pink arrow, a bloody blade. I was correct. ...more

This Week in Essays

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At Catapult, Toni Jensen writes a mesmerizing narrative of documenting assault and human trafficking intermixed with her experiences at Standing Rock and facing threats of violence.

At Hazlitt, Aparita Bhandari examines goddess figures and the ways that within current belief systems such figures can be both problematic and reassuring.

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The Rumpus Interview with Roxane Gay

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Roxane Gay discusses her new collection, Difficult Women, the problem with whiteness as the default and the need for diverse representation, and life as a workaholic. ...more

Poem of the Day: “At Night the States” by Alice Notley

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“At Night the States” is a famous poem that, whether you have or haven’t heard it before, strikes you over the head repeatedly. Formally inventive without any loss in the depth of its feeling, Notley transcends the genre of elegy to an expression of grief that might register unmediated: it is a present poem, an immediate poem, an inconsolable poem.

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The Alienation of an Irish Abortion

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Was it a dream? A nightmare? I felt like I’d been sold a lie. There was no husband or caring partner, no safe home or solid income. Just me, pregnant and alone, in an abortion clinic with my rapist. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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short-fiction

In a political climate in which undocumented immigrants are painted as criminals and rapists and half the country is crying for deportation, this week’s story reminds us that immigrants are fathers who love their daughters, who work hard and send money home to dying mothers, who will go to the ends of the Earth for their loved ones—they are normal Americans with normal hearts, just like the rest of us.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Such a Thing

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The future perfect tense indicates an action that is certain to occur. But when the future is not perfect or certain, the conditional “would” is more appropriate. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Vi Khi Nao

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Vi Khi Nao on her new novel Fish in Exile, why women shouldn't apologize (even when they're wrong), moving between genres, and why humor is vital in a novel full of darkness and grief. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Never Let Me Go

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"You can’t hold on to the past," Elif once told me. "You don’t know how. You don’t know what to keep, what to throw away. So you keep it all. And you can’t do that. No one can." ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #10: Art Lives!

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Sunday: I work through the voting guide, propositions, and candidates, making my decisions. My partner, Argyle C, Klopnick (ACK!), is sure, now, that Hillary’s victory is certain. I ‘m not yet a believer. I think Trump is electable.

Monday: I’m catching the excitement.

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What We Lost: Undoing the Fairy Tale Narrative of Adoption

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The singular, unavoidable truth about adoption is that it requires the undoing of one family so that another one can come into being. ...more

America Again

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I felt urgently that it was the moment to tell the story of what I’ve learned about American music—or maybe about being an American. ...more

A Man’s ABCs of Miscarriage

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I once heard the only thing faster than the speed of light is the speed of thought, and I wonder if simply thinking about Sawyer’s sister until my head hurts could get us to the place we fear talking about. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Max Porter

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Max Porter discusses his debut novel, Grief is the Thing with Feathers, literary genres, and the changing roles of editors. ...more

Rosanne Cash - Black Cadillac | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: Rosanne Cash’s Black Cadillac

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In her voice, I am held, cradled even. I am equal parts longing and hope. I am home. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Anuk Arudpragasam

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Anuk Arudpragasm discusses his debut novel The Story of a Brief Marriage, the bombing of civilians during the war in Sri Lanka, documenting war crimes, and powerful Tamil women. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: The Year of Light and Dark

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It isn’t much of a contest to say that Julie Coyne is the single most inspirational human being I have ever met. And I am here—in Xela—in part because I could use a little inspiration. ...more

The Rumpus Review of One More Time with Feeling

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“We didn’t ask for it,” Cave begins another poetic flight, and again we think he’s talking about something ghastly, “but it’s all around us, a gratuitous beauty.” ...more