Posts Tagged: growing up

Don’t Think Twice and the Power of Improvising through the Unknown

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It’s a little extraordinary when you realize that you’re the one getting in your own way. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #71: Kris D’Agostino

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In Kris D’Agostino’s second novel, The Antiques, he returns to familiar forms: A dysfunctional family whose members are in various stages of arrested development; a generational home in upstate New York; and the absurdity of life in its most darkly comedic moments.

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: I Died of Dysentery

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The glorious ways we fifth graders died in Mr. Mosher’s computer class. We strove to die in the most imaginable permutations possible. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #64: Lianne Stokes

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Hi there! We’re the two brunettes who hate sex. Sara-Kate hates sex because it’s too aerobic—she once sprained her foot. She lives in Kips Bay, loves candy, and wears exclusively rompers. Elisa Jordana hates sex because she abhors the human penis and all its functions.

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The Rumpus Interview with Wendy C. Ortiz

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Wendy C. Ortiz discusses her new book Bruja, what a "dreamoire" is, the magic all around us, and why she loves indices—and cats. ...more

A “Girl” and Her Mother

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At The Millions, Naa Baako Ako-Adjei discusses reading Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” through the lens of her relationship with her own mother growing up, and her new understanding of the story fifteen years later:

In my rereading of “Girl,” I also realized that I never noticed how transgressive the story is.

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A Study of Homeland in Displacement

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To think of Brazil as a different place than I remember it is to think of my unbelonging, as someone out of place in my memory. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Rion Amilcar Scott

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Rion Amilcar Scott discusses his new collection Insurrections, creating a fictional town, and the pressure to make religious decisions during puberty. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Monkey Men

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Still lying on the bed in the Wausau hotel room, I started counting ceiling tiles. From above the covers. Not under. Never under. I always feel constricted, under. ...more

The Commune

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Our house, we believed, was a microcosm of that country. Every month, we’d gather at the kitchen table for our house meeting, where we, like politicians, unveiled our big plans for change. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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In a darkly humorous new story at n+1, Jen George questions the qualifications of being “adult,” gives thirty-somethings across the world nightmares, and packs in plenty of social criticism while she’s at it. The story, “Guidance/The Party,” follows a single, childless, career-less, 33-year-old woman who is visited by a mysterious Guide.

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Reading Mademoiselle Gantrel

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We squinted into the smoky room and saw ourselves on junior year abroad, frolicking on the Left Bank with artists in berets like hers. ...more
Scissor Sisters - Night Work | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: Scissor Sisters’s Night Work

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Night Work is a queer sonic fantasia soaked heavy in the 1980s. ...more

On Playing Games, Productivity, and Right Livelihood

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One week last spring I said it out loud for the first time: “Sometimes I play so long, my fingers go numb.” ...more

Goddesses

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I closed my laptop. I thought of words such as “contexts” and “perspectives.” The next morning, I checked out an armload of books from the university library. I had to learn to defend Durga. ...more
Prince - 1979 | Rumpus Music

Five Stages of Prince Fandom

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You don’t need to know him personally, you say. You get the best of Prince through his music. Maybe that’s the truth, and maybe it isn’t. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Primal Talk

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One of the thrills of being a writer is becoming aware of the wildness that percolates inside of you. If you’ve learned to listen, you’re able to hear it. ...more

When Does a Writer Grow Up?

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The Atlantic examines adulthood and how we get there, including a close look at the life of a writer:

Henry published his first book…when he was 31 years old, after 12 years of changing jobs and bouncing back and forth between his parents’ home, living on his own, and crashing with a buddy, who believed in his potential…He may have floundered during young adulthood, but Henry David Thoreau turned out pretty okay.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Remembering Molly

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Ten years later I still wondered about those aviator glasses and whether The Breakfast Club could restore us. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Wanting To Dance

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It just felt so comfortable to slide back into singing, “She Loves You,” and know for that moment, everything was the same. ...more