Posts Tagged: Guernica

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Tuesday, Guernica published “Walking on Water,” an excerpt from Payem Faeli’s 2010 novella, I Will Grow, I Will Bear Fruit… Figs. In this excerpt, translated into English by Sarah Khalili, Faeli provides a meditative taste of the novella’s wandering narrator, a young boy in search of a name.

...more

The Literary Underground

By

Raphael Allison, at Guernica, fuses together his experience at this year’s MLA conference in Chicago with the subculture of the modernists in order to discuss the “crisis in the humanities”:

Mods and literary academics are caught between the allure of wildness, ingenuity, and nonconformity and the desire for some sort of stability, recognition, and achievement.

...more

We Respectfully Decline

By

At Guernica, Alexandria Peary observes a fine but lethal distinction between being declined and being rejected, a difference that had very real effects on the literary ambitions of nineteenth-century female writers. While to decline a submission implies thoughtful deliberation over that particular work, rejection is an all-encompassing denouncement of something larger: a category or, in this case, a gender:

Women writers in the nineteenth century—when creative writing really got going as a possible profession—faced more rejections than declines, though probably more than a spoonful of dejection.

...more

What We Talk About When We Talk About the American South

By

The latest issue of Guernica is out, and it’s a doozy. The special issue—the first of 4 such issues funded by a Kickstarter campaign—takes on the American South. Features include novelist Kiese Laymon in conversation with his mother on language and love in the South (check out our own interview with Laymon here) and Rumpus contributor Lincoln Michel‘s essay “Lush Rot,” on the deep roots of Southern Gothic tradition.

...more

Do Writers Also Have to Be Protesters?

By

Pankaj Mishra has always been a politically outspoken writer, so when Mo Yan, who has defended the Chinese government’s censorship, won the Nobel Prize, Mishra was the last person anyone expected to defend him.

But he did, asking, “Do we ever expose the political preferences of Mo Yan’s counterparts in the West to such harsh scrutiny?”

...more

“I Am an Alien”

By

Moving to the US as a person of color isn’t easy, even when you do everything completely above-board, come from a nation friendly with the US, and arrive with a respectable family in tow.

Toni Nealie discusses her experience coming to America from New Zealand in an essay for Guernica:

My iris is captured in a biometrics file with the U.S Immigration Service….My deep brown eyes, the eyes that have held the gaze of my beloved, the eyes that look like my mother’s, that my newborn sons searched for and struggled to focus on: these are now U.S territory.

...more

War-less Class

By

For at least a decade, Americans have been living in the shadow of war and yet, except in pop fiction of the Tom Clancy variety (where, in the end, we always win), there’s remarkably little evidence of it

At Guernica, novelist Beverly Gologorsky takes on the inexplicable absence of war from contemporary fiction and mentions that it is strictly related to social class.

...more

Notable NYC: 11/30–12/6

By

Saturday 12/7: Natalie Eilbert, Mike Bushnell, Rob Ostrom, and Christie Ann Reynolds inaugurate the Banquet reading series with an evening of poetry. Eilbert is the founder and editor of The Atlas Review. The Banquet series was launched intending to highlight the intersection of poetry performance and audience experience; it is the product of curators Joshua Kleinberg, Alexis Pope, and Dana Jaye Cadman.

...more

Black Quotations from Marion Berry to Natasha Trethewey

By

For Guernica, Lauren K. Alleyne interviews Retha Powers, editor of the new Bartlett’s Familiar Black Quotations, which collects quotes by a rainbow of black sources, from Zora Neale Hurston to NWA to ancient Egypt.

It’s a really interesting glimpse at the necessity and difficulty of distilling the essence of “the black experience” from all the different black experiences in the whole diaspora.

...more

“I Threw Out Everything”

By

For Guernica, Jamilah King talks to Daniel Alarcón about his new novel, “Peru’s most notorious prison,” and what it feels like to throw out 400 pages of work and start over:

I showed it to a couple friends with a great deal of weariness and kind of a little bit of hope thinking that they were going to tell me that I was wrong, that this draft was good.

...more

A Wild Excerpt from White Girls

By

Guernica has a lengthy excerpt up from White Girls, the genre-warping new collection of cultural criticism, personal memoir, and who knows what else by the New Yorker‘s Hilton Als.

It’s complex, challenging, and completely, enthrallingly beautiful, so it’s impossible to choose just one quote to represent it, but here’s an attempt:

We were something dark and unforeseen: two colored gentlemen who moved through the largely white social world we inhabited in New York (the world where art and fashion and journalism converged) who did not exploit each other or our obvious physical traits…for political sympathy or social gain.

...more

Jumpers

By

“The Golden Gate Bridge was born a metaphor….The span would connect San Francisco with Marin County, engineering with nature, and the past with the future”—and, for a queasily high number of people, life with death.

For Guernica, Candace Opper looks at the history of the legendary bridge’s suicidal jumpers, including interviews with the people who, against all odds, survived the fall.

...more

“He Smells Your Fear”

By

…beyond any fear is a greater circumambient fear, a terror, that one will be insufficiently able to hold that fear. That if the stimulus is present and ongoing, unchecked, one might fall apart, come to pieces, in her faculties disintegrate.

Writer Bryan Blanchfield was attacked by his family dog at age nine, so viciously that a surgeon had to be flown in to repair his mutilated face.

...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Marilyn Hacker Is No Hack

By

Here’s hoping more people read the concise and precise interview about translation up on Guernica between Erica Wright and Marilyn Hacker.

When we talk about someone being a prolific translator, Marilyn Hacker — who is a fantastic poet, let’s not forget that — is the poster child: “In the past five years alone, she’s brought the work of Hedi Kaddour, Guy Goffette, Vénus Khoury-Ghata, Marie Etienne,” plus (as Hacker notes), Amina Saïd and Habib Tengour.

...more

Guernica’s Interviews With Banned Authors

By

In commemoration of Banned Books Week (September 30th – October 6th), Guernica will be posting interviews with authors whose work was deemed too controversial. The site will also post essays that explore numerous censored texts:

“In recognition of this week, against censorship, and in support of writers and readers, the Guernica Daily will be publishing interviews with authors whose books have been banned or challenged and essays on works of fiction that have been oft removed from schools, libraries and book stores.”

You can read Katie Ryder’s full introduction to next week’s postings here.

...more

Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me

By

“I’m sure someone out there has a workable solution. But what do I know? I make comic books and write about jazz. I do know the difference between right and wrong, though.”

As the second anniversary of Harvey Pekar’s death approaches, Guernica shares an excerpt from his posthumous graphic novel, Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me.

...more

Memory Excavation

By

Guernica examines the intersections of science, emotion, and memory by way of an exchange between novelist Rivka Galchen and neuroscience professor David Linden, featured in the Rubin Museum’s Brainwave series.

“As Linden explains in his book, ‘memory retrieval is an active and dynamic process.’ Thus recollecting past experiences—reliving them again and again or retelling them to others—subtly modifies the memories we keep.

...more