Posts Tagged: history

Every Woman Is a Nation unto Herself: A Conversation with Sabina Murray

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Sabina Murray discusses the novel Valiant Gentleman, writing characters that are fundamentally different from herself, and confronting issues of colonization. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Clarence Major

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Clarence Major discusses his new collection Chicago Heat and Other Stories, the artist's role in politics, Donald Trump and race relations, and Paris in the good old days. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #68: David Kukoff

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“To read,” wrote E.M. Cioran, “is to let someone else do the work for you.” Indeed, David Kukoff has done extensive footwork collecting an array of varied experiences to give us an idea of what it was to live in LA during what might arguably be one of its most pivotal decades.

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The Rumpus Interview with Robert Glancy

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Robert Glancy discusses his sophomore novel, Please Do Not Disturb, growing up under a dictatorship, borrowing and stealing from reality, and his love of proverbs. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Nádleehí: One Who Changes

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I am scared. I will continue to be scared. I am scared that, one day, I will not be able to run as fast as my dad who eluded rocks and a tire iron. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Lucy Jane Bledsoe

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Lucy Jane Bledsoe discusses her latest book, A Thin Bright Line, uncovering the remarkable story of her aunt, and illuminating history through the lens of imagination. ...more

This Week in Books: The French Revolution: From Enlightenment to Tyranny

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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Podcatcher #6: The History Channeler

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Scott Pinkmountain, host of The History Channeler, on how he created the podcast, music, comedy, and his love of Tom Cavanagh. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation

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Parker set out to bring a different kind of “slavery movie” to audiences. And it is different. ...more

Color at the Mercy of the Light

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What if I said: while people still believe they are white in America, that delusion, and the dream upon which it is founded, needs to be seriously examined. ...more

Travel Writing as Artifact

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At the Public Domain Review, Nandini Das revisits The Principle Navigations and argues that the massive folio of travel writings compiled by Richard Hakluyt in 1589 is more than an artifact of British colonialism. It also memorializes, “the elusive traces of those who disappeared, the disappointment of the non-event, the tedium of travel, and the absence of wonder” that characterized the era for many who lived through it.

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Notes from the Underground

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For Hazlitt, Hugh Ryan attempts to document the many personas of mid-1900s drag performer Malvina Schwartz, bringing color to the landmarks and styles of a queer world that sometimes threatens to be forgotten. Ultimately his work illustrates the piecemeal nature of queer historiography and the intermittently rewarding and disheartening detective work of pursuing these stories:

The history of that recording is a microcosm for queer history itself: fragmented, discontinuous, and surprising to the modern ear.

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Hitler’s Ghostwriter

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New evidence uncovered by history professor and researcher Thomas Weber indicates that Hitler himself wrote the 1923 biography Adolf Hitler: His Life and His Speeches, which is credited to Baron Adolf Victor von Koerbe. Weber’s research implies that Hitler had designs on power earlier than historians originally thought, reports Dina Kraft for the New York Times

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Bodies in Space: Teaching after Trauma

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Turning onto my street and looking south I feel the ground drop beneath me every time—I turn the corner and the sidewalk falls. I feel invisible then, as if I’ve vaporized. ...more

Podcatcher #4: Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

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Jonathan Van Ness discusses his podcast, Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness, fierceness, curiosity, and hairstyles. ...more

Sociology and Art with W. E. B. DuBois

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Allison Meier writes for Hyperallergic on the hand-drawn, recently digitized data visualizations produced by W. E. B. DuBois (in collaboration with others) to demonstrate the size and scope of black life in America at the turn of the 20th century. These sociological charts cover population percentages, property ownership, chosen fields of study and professions by black people leading up to Paris’s Exposition Universelle of 1900.

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Thinking about the Past as If It Were the Future

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Chuck Klosterman’s new book, But What If We’re Wrong, theorizes how today will appear in the history books. But how will his own work hold up?

The further in the future you peer the more impossible it is to anticipate what that future will look like or even what its denizens believe about the basic principles of existence, let alone what books they’re reading.

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Translating Queer Identity and History

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For Notches, a journal on the history of sexuality, Claire Hayward collects a series of responses from historians on writing queer history. These responses address the question, methods, and terminology in translating historical queer experiences to the present day, as well as the necessity for creating a space for queer historical figures in our collective past.

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Rumpus Original Fiction: On Documentation

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What is it like to be you? he was always asking, in his way, and it seemed a stupid question then. I didn’t know. I could lie better than I could tell the truth. I hadn’t left yet. ...more

Rediscovering Amber Reeves

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For Full Stop, Emma Schneider reviews a recently republished book: Amber Reeves’s 1914 novel A Lady and Her Husband, which Schneider aligns with “American pre-war feminist classics such as The Awakening and The Yellow Wallpaper.” Reeves’s novel offers a comparatively more practical look at the emergence of pre-feminist concerns at the turn of the 20th century.

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