Posts Tagged: home

asilsolomon

The Rumpus Interview with Asali Solomon

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Asali Solomon discusses her debut novel, Disgruntled, narrative structure, the mythology of memory and place, and returning to Philadelphia after years away. ...more

Homeward Unbound

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Some would argue that the loss of privacy is a small price to pay to have your voice heard on an international scale. But over at the Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates writes honestly and unpretentiously about his difficulties returning home as a prominent literary figure, and how his sudden visibility carries a safety concern particular to being a black man who regularly speaks his truth:

But the world is real.

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Voices of Addiction #1: Baby’s Home

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I got to thinking about home. What the fuck is home anyway? ...more

The Conversation

The Conversation: Jayson Smith and A. H. Jerriod Avant

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My responsibility is to not be negligent and cause unnecessary harm. To a listener or reader. My allegiance is only to truth. ...more

The Conversation

The Conversation: Jeremy Clark and Thiahera Nurse

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I’m thinking about the difference between “I stay somewhere” and “I live somewhere.” ...more

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Defeat

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It never occurred to me to try to write poems without the guidance of other poets and poems. ...more

Places to Call Home

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Rather than being shot at, my new fear would be of seeing the officers unleash violence upon a helpless body, having to watch within the confines of my approximated uniform, padded with a bullet proof vest, which would incontrovertibly claim me, identify my orientation toward the police and not the helpless body, drown me out even though I can’t imagine that I wouldn’t be screaming, I am the kind of person who screams.

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Chaitali Sen feature

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Chaitali Sen

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Swati Khurana talks to the author of The Pathless Sky, a love story centered around place, the state’s authority, statelessness, and geology. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Review: 99 Homes

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99 Homes continues Bahrani’s tendency to take on big topics, to cut them into chewable pieces for its audience ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Zarina Zabrisky

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Zarina Zabrisky talks about her new book, Explosion, the art of the short story, Russia and Ukraine, and being "a Jewish pessimist in the spirit of Shalom Aleichem." ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Megan Kruse

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Author Megan Kruse talks about her debut novel, Call Me Home, queer characters in rural places, sibling relationships, and how the music of Lucinda Williams inspires her. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Song in the Subjunctive

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Perhaps the city looked more poignantly lovely because I was conscious of its tragic history. ...more

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Growing Up: The Rumpus Interview with Michelle Tea

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Michelle Tea discusses life in recovery, the meaning of family, motherhood, and her new memoir How to Grow Up. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Transparent and the Evolving Culture of Shame

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There's a ray of nuclear longing at the center of Transparent... ...more

Temporary Residence

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At NYT Magazine, Maggie Jones profiles an entire generation: the South Korean adoptees making the trek back “home.” But having spent their lives abroad, where “home” is becomes a tough question to answer:

As Trenka writes in her memoir, “The Language of Blood”: “How can I weigh the loss of my language and culture against the freedom that America has to offer, the opportunity to have the same rights as a man?

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The Last Book I Loved: The Ocean at the End of the Lane

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I couldn’t wait to read it, but I was also infinitely patient. It’s that delayed gratification thing. I’m a sucker for it, and there are books that are worth the wait. ...more

Finding Home

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Growing up all over the place makes you skilled at adapting, but it also makes you hungry to belong, something that in part motivates my writing: carving out a space I know, trying to understand what I’m witnessing around me. The experiences of others everywhere.

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goodbyetoallthat

On Loving and Leaving New York: Home

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Driving down Second Avenue, we saw the usuals: skater kids and college students, queens and models and junkies. My heart hurt more and more. The landmarks of my most troubled memories now filled my heart with longing. I even missed my ghosts. ...more