Posts Tagged: Hurricane Katrina

Watching the World End: A History of The Weather Channel

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[A]ll this sensationalism has made The Weather Channel, inadvertently and ever increasingly, the essential television viewing experience of the Anthropocene. ...more

Finding the Finally: Alice Anderson Discusses Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away

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Alice Anderson on her memoir, Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away, drag, and motherhood. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #76: Chris Tusa

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Set in post-Katrina New Orleans, Chris Tusa’s second novel, In the City of Falling Stars (Livingston Press, September 2016), tells a tale of paranoia and intrigue. Maurice Delahoussaye witnesses dead birds falling from the sky, and becomes convinced the air is toxic.

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Beyoncé’s “Formation”

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This Saturday, Beyoncé dropped “Formation,” her first single since 2014. The song came one day before the Queen’s Superbowl 50 appearance and was accompanied by a free download via Tidal, Pitchfork reports.

Like most of the artist’s videos, the video for “Formation” is incredibly visually compelling, moving from an Antebellum House to images protesting police brutality to Beyoncé sinking, atop a cop car, in the flood waters of Hurricane Katrina.

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The Rumpus Interview with Elliot Ackerman

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Elliot Ackerman discusses his debut novel Green on Blue, fighting with the Marine Corps in the Second Battle of Fallujah, and being labeled as a journalist . ...more

Word of the Day: Vaticinate

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(v.);  to prophesy or foretell the future; from the Latin vati– (“seer”) + -cin-, combining form of canere (“to sing, prophesy”)

Louisiana, Louisiana, They’re tryin’ to wash us away. They’re tryin’ to wash us away.”

—Randy Newman, from “Louisiana 1927.”

Much has been written on the subject of the human race’s fear of the unknown: from speculating on what happens after we die to relentless attempts to predict the future, from the impact of technology to whether it’s going to rain tomorrow.

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Towards a Fight

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The future is coming, it is coming for everyone in this story. Someday that cop will turn on his TV and see the first black president, the first president who looks like he does, say that he thinks couples like me and Dee ought to be able to marry if we want to. Which probably means we ought to be able to kiss. ...more