Posts Tagged: hyperallergic

What Is the Meaning of Life? Ask a Curator

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Hrag Vartanian reports on recent curator capers for Hyperallergic: #AskaCurator day was conceived by UK-based Mar Dixon and has been embraced by many museums around the world. Yesterday, to mark the occasion, two well-known art writers (Jörg Colberg in Massachusetts and Carolina Miranda in California) decided to poke fun at the daylong curatorial celebration in their own social media–savvy way.

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The Medium Is the Message

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“Hoping this will aid in concealing your Sunday affliction,” read a card attached to the beige garment. “With the compliments of Clyfford Still.” In 1952, disgruntled abstract expressionist Clyfford Still sent art critic Emily Genauer a pair of rubber underpants in response to her criticism of his work. The question is, did he sign them? Read more […]

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Sociology and Art with W. E. B. DuBois

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Allison Meier writes for Hyperallergic on the hand-drawn, recently digitized data visualizations produced by W. E. B. DuBois (in collaboration with others) to demonstrate the size and scope of black life in America at the turn of the 20th century. These sociological charts cover population percentages, property ownership, chosen fields of study and professions by […]

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Art Imitating (Imaginary) Life

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Rubens Ghenov’s solo exhibit at the Morgan Lehman Gallery, Accoutrements in Marwa, an Interlude in Silver, has an interesting source of inspiration: For the past four years, Ghenov’s paintings have been inspired by the unpublished philosophical texts and verse of the late Spanish poet Angelico Morandá. Said to be born in Spain in 1940, the […]

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Understanding Palmyra

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Why do we care so much about these ruins, while paying so little attention to the more recent past or present of Syria? Perhaps because we can assimilate these classical remains to our own past. At Hyperallergic, Michael Press explores the Anglophone world’s relationship with the ancient city of Palmyra in present-day Syria, providing a […]

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What Country… Should Give You Harbour?

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Allison Meier writes at Hyperallergic on a speech, recently digitized by the British Library, that proves to be the only example of Shakespeare’s handwriting other than a few signatures. The excerpt comes from Sir Thomas More, a play written in collaboration, wherein the title character asks for sympathy for migrants, driven from their homes and countries.

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History in Color

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At Hyperallergic, Chris Cobb explores new photography exhibits featuring over 200 color photos from a recently rediscovered collection by Gordon Parks. The collection dates from 1956, when Parks was commissioned by LIFE magazine to capture the day-to-day of black families in segregated Alabama. Only about thirty of the original 200+ color photos ever made it into the magazine.

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A Figurative Recovery from War

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In his review for Hyperallergic of a new MOMA exhibit, Thomas Micchelli writes about the work of artists during and immediately after their experiences in World War II. In the exhibit, Soldier, Spectre, Shaman: The Figure and the Second World War, Micchelli claims that the 20th century art historical record finally will be reconciled with […]

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Alter Egos and the Obscurity of Personas

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At Hyperallergic, Daniel Owen reflects on the Robert Seydel exhibit at the Queens Museum. The late writer and artist’s display explores alter egos and the obscurity of personas, as well as the blending and fluidity of the visual and textual artistic mediums: In many of these texts, a rectangular passage is accompanied by lineated fragments, […]

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Meet the Oldest Multicolor Printed Book

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At Hyperallergic, Allison Meier offers a history of the oldest multicolor printed book, recently digitized and published online by the Cambridge University Library system. The manual [the 17th-century Manual of Calligraphy and Painting (Shi zhu zhai shu hua pu)] is the earliest known book with polychrome xylography, where each image involved several printing blocks with […]

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Blake’s Book of Job

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In addition to his place in the canon as a seminal Romantic poet, William Blake was an accomplished visual artist. In a write-up for Hyperallergic, Allison Meier shares the fruits of her visit to see Blake’s 21-panel series of engravings on the Book of Job, on display at Manhattan’s Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA) through […]

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