Posts Tagged: imagination

The Dark All Around Us

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There is still light in the dark. This is the paradox that Little Bear has to accept in order to fall asleep.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #103: Andrew Battershill

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Picture the French Surrealists recast as mobsters running a crime ring and you have the premise for Batterhill’s story.

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Steering Clear of “McMagic”

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At the New Yorker, an elegant and comprehensive essay by Julie Phillips from a visit with Ursula Le Guin at her home in Portland, Oregon touches on the importance of place, both geographic and imaginative. Phillips writes, “[Le Guin] has always defended the fantastic, by which she means not formulaic fantasy or “McMagic” but the imagination […]

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In This Hell Here With You

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When people call other people crazy I don’t get mad, I get bored. When people tell me ghosts don’t exist, I just get bored. Over at JSTOR Daily, poet Dorothea Lasky writes about The Imagination, “a physical space that one shares with other people in and through poetry,” the palpable materiality of alternative existences (like […]

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Child’s Play

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Not a day goes by that there isn’t some new study on how children’s brains work and what kind of media they should be consuming, With all the scientifically backed books out there now, it’s good to also have some children’s literature that’s still about introducing them to what stories can do. For Slate, Adrienne […]

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You Are Here

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Nabokov understood the seduction of maps as a way of ordering the fantastic, the disorderly, the sometimes contradictory nature of description, a visual aid to the internal eye. For Lit Hub, Susan Daitch gives a sweeping textual overview of the ways in which different authors have used maps to enrich their work, demonstrating how they […]

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The Magical World of Children’s Literature

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Over at the Atlantic, Colleen Gillard takes a critical look at the differences between British and American children’s stories. While British stories for children tend to be rooted in fantasy and folklore, she writes, American children’s classics tend to be more grounded in realism. “Each style has its virtues, but the British approach undoubtedly yields the […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Sword and Her Sister

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Frozen is a study in what happens when imagination is constrained to a single narrative arc

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The Rumpus Interview with Neil Smith

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Author Neil Smith discusses his latest book, Boo, the suffering inherent in being thirteen years old, and how friendship can help pull us through traumatic events in our lives.

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