Posts Tagged: immigrants

The Rumpus Interview with Micah Perks

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Micah Perks talks about her new novel, What Becomes Us, America’s cultural and mythical heritage, and why every novel is a political novel. ...more

This Week in Trumplandia

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trumplandia

Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent and relevant content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy, toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of the truth.

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Fitting Characters and Scripts

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Unwittingly, my mother teaches me in this conversation her generation’s word for gay: 同性恋. I look it up in an online dictionary, three characters in my mother’s tongue. Same, sex, and love. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Imbolo Mbue

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Imbolo Mbue discusses her debut novel Behold the Dreamers, teaching herself how to write a novel, and the price of the American Dream. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 6): “To Elsie”

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Now the battle is joined. I will prosecute my part of it as a writer till the last dog dies... ...more

A Letter to My Male Friends Who May Not Know That They Are Women

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Dearest loves,

As you are, I am stricken. I am devastated. I am unmade.

We have all felt a terrible blow. And yet, of course, we all feel it differently, and have different understandings of what has befallen us, and what is to come.

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Natural Born Drivers

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He only knew that the Blazer, like the green card, was something he wanted my brother and me to have, so that we knew we deserved things, things like America. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Jade Chang

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Jade Chang discusses her new novel The Wangs vs. the World, citizen journalism, and how to write an immigrant story that's not all about pain. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Saleem Haddad

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Saleem Haddad discusses his debut novel Guapa, the Orlando shootings, the importance of queer spaces, and Arab literature. ...more

A Study of Homeland in Displacement

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To think of Brazil as a different place than I remember it is to think of my unbelonging, as someone out of place in my memory. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #54: Jade Chang on The Wangs vs. the World

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With a mix of humor, agility, and insight, Jade Chang’s debut novel, The Wangs vs. the World (HMH Books, October 2016), tells a fresh immigrant story. Charles Wang has left his native homeland to become a successful businessman in America. The book takes us on a journey with his whole family as they navigate the ups and downs of fortune and travel across the US.

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The Rumpus Interview with Leland Cheuk

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Leland Cheuk discusses his novel The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong, dark humor, cancer, morally corrupt characters, and his mother. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Rion Amilcar Scott

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Rion Amilcar Scott discusses his new collection Insurrections, creating a fictional town, and the pressure to make religious decisions during puberty. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Heirlooms

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The strings of our DNA mark us as one, but it’s the roots of our memories that bind us. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Ranbir Singh Sidhu

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Ranbir Singh Sidhu discusses his new novel, Deep Singh Blue, growing up in rural California, and the privileged, problematic world of publishing. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Janine Joseph

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The day the manuscript became Driving without a License was the day I said “yes” to the truth of my own life and coming-of-age experience as an undocumented immigrant. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Jensen Beach

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Jensen Beach about his short story collection Swallowed by the Cold, suburbia in Sweden, quiet racism, and writing a series of connected short stories. ...more

A Place That She Herself Has Imagined

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Brooklyn is a place of layers both personal and historical, one that, as Colm Tóibín puts it, is “full of ghosts.” Reflecting on the recent film adaptation of his novel, the Brooklyn author observes one of the borough’s more visible specters:

You could invent yourself here, even if the term self-invention was not yet understood by you.

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Plankton (A Body of Stars)

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Plankton either grows into something other than plankton—a strong swimming non-planktonic adult, like a crab or a fish, or it stays the same—forever drifting with the shifting tides. ...more

Displaced in the Grotesque

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O’Connor is so often remembered as a misanthropic homebody—but she was comforted by the idea of a God that gave preferential treatment to the most vulnerable among us.

For the Paris Review, Dave Griffith writes about reading Flannery O’Connor’s “The Displaced Person,” a story of immigrants in O’Connor’s classic grotesque South, during the global refugee crisis.

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The Rumpus Interview with Atossa Araxia Abrahamian

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Atossa Araxia Abrahamian on her new book The Cosmopolites, the citizenship market, nearly getting deported in the Comoros, and learning to show up and wait. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Annie Liontas

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Annie Liontas talks about her debut novel Let Me Explain You, crafting voices, and the benefits—and occasional pitfalls—of returning to get an MFA after years of writing in the dark. ...more

Writing Better Diverse Books

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But between publishers’, readers’ (audiences!), editors’, writers’—and, it turns out, MFA students’—definitions, the term “immigrant fiction” has become a muddle, a catchall phrase to describe anything that appears “non-American,” foreign in some way.

Bix Gabriel writes for Guernica on what we categorize as “immigrant fiction” and the limitations of under-defined genre.

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The Rumpus Interview with Mia Alvar

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Author Mia Alvar discusses her debut short story collection, In the Country, fictional motherhood, literature’s role in society, and the limits of belonging to a place. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Reading Don Quijote with My Mother

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“That’s the anthem I would have sung at my original graduation if the university had stayed open,” my mother said. ...more