Posts Tagged: infertility

It’s All Metaphorical: A Conversation with Laurette Folk

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Laurette Folk discusses her new collection, Totem Beasts, the role of meditation and dreams in her work, and "seeking some heightened experience in the conscious world." ...more

A Hinging Thing: Talking with Maggie Smith

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Maggie Smith discusses her new collection Good Bones, how motherhood has changed her writing, and what it felt like to have a poem go viral. ...more

President of Smut

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Our country has always been ruled by and for the privileged, but never has this glaring injustice in the system been made so shamelessly clear. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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For the rest of this month, Granta will be publishing the winners of the 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize, awarded to five writers from five regions of the globe, with the mission to connect storytellers across cultures through the power of fiction.

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Immigration and Infertility: Talking with Shanthi Sekaran

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Shanthi Sekaran discusses her new novel, Lucky Boy, where fraught issues like immigration and infertility—and the lives they impact—intersect. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Belle Boggs

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Belle Boggs discusses The Art of Waiting about navigating through the difficulties of conception and fertility treatment. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Monica Youn

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Monica Youn about her new collection Blackacre, hypothetical tracts of land, Milton, and infertility. ...more

Pregnant Words

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In the New York Times, Rachel Cusk takes on two new memoirs about infertility and the quest for motherhood to explore the wholly compelling “half-analogy between the writing student and the woman embarking on in vitro fertilization.” Julia Leigh’s Avalanche relates six years of the author’s trying and ultimately failing to get pregnant; Belle Boggs, in The Art of Waiting, uses Virginia Woolf’s account of childlessness to explore her own.

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Are We All Our Own Vanishing

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We will never be an exclamation point, an ellipses, a question mark. We must all leave with this: a period—solid, and utterly irrefutable. ...more