Posts Tagged: J. D. Salinger

Salinger’s “Inscrutable” Text

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For The Millions, Christian Kriticos revisits J.D. Salinger’s story “Hapworth 16, 1924,” and tries to place the story within Salinger’s celebrated career. Although the story receives much criticism for its “strange” meandering style, Kriticos claims this structure “follows the contours of the mind” and that it should be appreciated for diverging from Salinger’s usual style:

Unlike the modernist form of stream-of-consciousness, “Hapworth” is both internal and external at the same time: in addressing his letter to his family, Seymour the narrator is communicating externally; but, at the same time, large portions of the letter seem to be directed at himself.

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The Rumpus Interview with Sean Wilsey

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Sean Wilsey discusses his latest book of essays, More Curious, being David Foster Wallace’s neighbor, the healing power of the American road trip, and the difference between writing fiction and memoir. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Thomas H. McNeely

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Thomas H. McNeely discusses coming of age in the 1970s, Houston's complicated racial history, and his new novel Ghost Horse. ...more

New, Old Salinger Stories

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Having realized the rights to three unpublished Salinger stories were unclaimed, small publisher Devault-Graves set about purchasing them. The stories were published earlier this week. But despite the fun of having a little more Salinger to read, some are unhappy with how the stories were released:

They’re more innocent, more trusting, but ultimately, and unfortunately, they’re not all that much to write home about.

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The Salinger Year

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My time at the Agency and reading Salinger brought me back to that state when you’re a kid or an adolescent – or just a person! – who reads for pleasure. I was able to go back to the pre-academic me who fully understood the actual pure power of literature to change a person’s life, to guide a person through life, or to allow a person to live fully.

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Lost Words For A Spruce Tree

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Over at The Hairpin, Isabelle Fraser interviews Ann Wroe, obituary writer for The Economist. Wroe has written obituaries for J.D. Salinger, Aaron Swartz, and the 25-year old carp that was “England’s best-loved fish”. On Marie Smith, the last person to speak Eyak, an Alaskan language, she relates:

“She was the only person left who remembered all the different words for all the parts of a spruce tree.

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A Young Holden Caulfield

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Last month, three of J.D. Salinger’s unpublished stories were leaked. One of these stories, “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls,” includes a young Holden Caulfield, and describes his brother’s death, “an incident only alluded to in the novel.”

In an essay featured by The Millions, Ian Rogers discusses the importance of respecting Salinger’s wishes to view “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls” as an experiment rather than a prequel to The Catcher in the Rye.

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“Kholden Kolfeeld’s” Russian Fans

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Amid the flood of J. D. Salinger articles related to the upcoming biography and documentary about him, this New Yorker essay by Reed Johnson stands out.

It has nothing to do with the biography, actually. It’s about Russian translations of The Catcher in the Rye (or Over the Abyss in Rye as the most popular one is titled) and raises all sorts of interesting questions about how to convey American ideas about iconoclasm and conformity—not to mention slang—to Russian readers.

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Less Face, More Book for These Reclusive Authors

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Though it can be hard to remember between tweeting at your favorite writer and joining a Facebook event page for a reading, there was a time when many authors led reclusive lives with minimal self-promotion.

Bookish has rounded up a list of some of the most private (Salinger, Pynchon)—and their modern-day, super-public opposites (John Green, Susan Orlean).

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The World Without You

The World Without You, by Joshua Henkin

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The World Without You, Joshua Henkin’s new book, is that rare breed: the twenty-first century domestic novel. Henkin’s characters, the Frankels – think Salinger’s Glass family, but more pretentious – spend the plot over a three-day period (it is, importantly, not a three-day weekend, as other reviewers of the book have misremembered) leading up to the fourth of July.

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The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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Blog is a fun word to say, even if I’m tired of hearing other people say it.

Eggers on Salinger.

Michaelangelo’s poem “When the Author Was Painting the Vault of the Sistene Chapel.” (via)

“Hey Oscar Wilde! It’s Clobbering Time!” Jacket Copy has fun with illustrators’ pictures of their favorite literary figures and characters.

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