Posts Tagged: Jane Eyre

What to Read When You Want to Celebrate Feminism

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We here at The Rumpus matriarchy are celebrating all of our feminist “mothers” this Mother’s Day!

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Saying What Shouldn’t Be Said: A Conversation with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, why writing about teenage girls is the most serious thing in the world, and finding truths in fiction.

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #17: Oppression, Ownership, Turkeys, and Roses

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Politics has become a bloated balloon on the horizon of our days, marked with the face of the Pr*sident, grinning under his orange corona like a demented sun-god, a raucous Ra. It burns.

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Wishing and Hoping: Card Tricks, Love Spells, and Methods of Escape

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I’ll go one further and posit that we need our illusionists: to disprove our eyes, investigate our dreams, and sometimes charm the money from our pockets.

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Fingerprints On Every Sentence

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For Electric Literature, Selin Gökcesu shares her experience rereading Jane Eyre. Though she had loved the novel in childhood, Gökcesu’s MFA experience and her “selective” adult perspective “eroded” her interest in the novel: At thirty-eight, what I perceived as Brontë’s moral standpoint rubbed me the wrong way. Nowadays, to enjoy a book, not only do […]

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The Heroine’s Journey

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What do Jane Eyre, Catherine Linton, and Katniss Everdeen have in common? “They can’t be pinned down. They are dazzlingly complex,” says Samantha Ellis, author of How to Be a Heroine, over at the BBC. Great heroines are fiercely passionate, Ellis writes. “And maybe that is really why these heroines last, because they make our own […]

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Between the Pages

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Long since buried and canonized, Charlotte Brontë is now subject to every writer’s worst nightmare. A poem and prose piece penned by a teenaged Brontë have recently been discovered between the pages of a book that belonged to the Victorian author’s mother. The Brontë Society will acquire the previously unpublished works within the next few […]

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Orphans in Literature

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At The New Inquiry, Alison Kinney examines the use of orphanhood in literature and what attracts readers to this narrative. She goes on to discuss the similarities and differences between orphans represented in literature, like Jane Eyre, and orphans in our real world: Fairy tales of stolen infants resonate with those of us who come from […]

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Rewrite, Reboot, Remix

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Rewriting the classics has become a stale and risk-averse strategy. But that shouldn’t spoil the fun of our larger culture of remixing.

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