Posts Tagged: Japanese

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Chris Santiago

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Chris Santigo on his new collection Tula, writing a multilingual text, and the connections between music and writing poetry. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Rhino Girl

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But these were not men, she realized. They were a cackle of spotted hyena, bright-toothed in the dark, and they were laughing at her. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Livraria Folha Seca in Rio de Janeiro was told that a sign about two-time medalist Adhemar Ferreira Silva, who passed away in 2001, violated the Olympic Committee’s advertising policies.

Reuters attempts to answer why millennials love buying books.

Inmates from Two Bridges Jail are helping the Wiscasset, Maine public library build bookshelves for a used bookstore.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Some people write about dystopian futures, or reimagined folktales, or ghosts, or science fiction. Sequoia Nagamatsu, author of the upcoming story collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, does it all. The debut collection, out this month from Black Lawrence Press, weaves Japanese folklore and pop culture into fantastical plots and futuristic settings to create stories that illuminate the human heart in modern times.

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The Slow Fall of the Hot Heroine

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If nothing else, it’s the opinion of other women that encroaches on mine. Resemblances spark my joy; differences become character flaws. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Sanae Ishida

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Sanae Ishida discusses her debut children's book, Little Kunoichi, The Ninja Girl, embracing her creativity after years in the corporate world, and finding inspiration in her young daughter. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jay Rubin

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Author and translator Jay Rubin talks about his new novel, The Sun Gods, translating Haruki Murakami into English, and the internment of Japanese citizens during World War II. ...more

Slow and Steady

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It took Gene Oishi 50 years to write his debut novel, a story about Japanese American identity and family during and after World War II. Over at The Nervous Breakdown, Oishi interviews himself about the process of writing Fox Drum Bebop:

I had a lot of excuses, but the reason I didn’t want to write about the war years was because I was unsure of who I was.

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