Posts Tagged: j.g. ballard

Notable NYC: 1/7–1/13

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Saturday 1/7: Greenlight Bookstore celebrates the grand opening of the store’s second location in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. 632 Flatbush Avenue, 7:30 p.m., free. Camonghne Felix and José Olivarez join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Sunday 1/8: Nancy Hightower, Sarah Perry, Jeremy Freedman, and Linda Harris Dolan join the Sundays at Erv’s reading […]

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But for Man’s Absence

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Released this May, director Ben Wheatley’s adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s 1975 sci-fi novel High-Rise converts the dystopian work into a tableau of striking visuals made all the more seductive by the presence of elegant Internet boyfriend du jour Tom Hiddleston. At Electric Literature, Michael Betancourt analyzes the contrasting versions of masculinity presented in the book and […]

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Rick Moody

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Rick Moody about his new book Hotels of North America, unreliable narrators, hotel porn, how titles are uncopyrightable, and Internet comment sections.

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Introducing Anna Kavan

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There’s an indispensable book called About Writing by Samuel R. Delany. In the first essay he cobbles together an eclectic list of authors that, ideally, the aspiring writer should read. Because Delany has read everything, you can bet his tastes are wide and varied. And it’s thanks to that book that I discovered Anna Kavan.

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When a Writer Becomes an Adjective

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Kafka. Joyce. Woolf. Dickens. Nabokov. All of these writers have become adjectives. (Arguably, “Kafkaesque” is the most overused one of the mix.  And “Nabokovian” the least-earned moniker.) Just last April, a prolific and prophetic English writer by the name of J.G. Ballard died. At some point in the cultural multiverse, he too became an adjective […]

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J.G. Ballard’s Pre-posthumous Memoir

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After eighteen novels and even more short story collections, J. G. Ballard directly approaches autobiography in his latest book Miracles of Life. (Read the London Guardian review here.) Though known for his dystopian science fiction, Ballard analyzes his own life with some surprisingly similar tools, principally Freud. LAWeekly labeled the book a “pre-posthumous memoir” because […]

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