Posts Tagged: journalism

Now, Writing is for Extroverts Too

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When my wife proposed writing a novel together last year, I was initially resistant but not for the most obvious reasons. I wasn’t worried about our ability to work together. I wasn’t even worried about whether we could actually produce a good novel.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Crushed

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He’s a cute mensch, I gathered, a cuddly fellow with a well- groomed beard, sad eyes, and, most importantly, a comforting voice that sounded like he was about to either cry or laugh. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Jamie Kornegay

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Novelist Jamie Kornegay talks about his debut, Soil, life in Mississippi, writing humor effectively, and the geography of isolation. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Elliot Ackerman

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Elliot Ackerman discusses his debut novel Green on Blue, fighting with the Marine Corps in the Second Battle of Fallujah, and being labeled as a journalist . ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Joshua Davis

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Joshua Davis talks about his new book, Spare Parts (now a movie playing all across the United States), backwards running, journalism, and entering the US National Arm Wrestling Championship. ...more

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Tom Sleigh

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Tom Sleigh about his new book, Station Zed,, how reportage and the surreal can combine inside a poem, and secularizing the mysteries of death, redemption, and resurrection. ...more

The Real Crisis

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Along with the other onslaught of reactions to The New Republic’s mass resignation, George Packer offers his own response at the New Yorker, suggesting that the “collapse” (along with the recent Rolling Stone debacle) shows a “crisis” in journalism:

The crisis in journalism is a business crisis, and it’s been going on for twenty years; the outcome remains far from obvious.

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Journalism vs. Silicon Valley

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What is really at the heart of the debate over The New Republic?

The tension between an engineering culture and an editorial culture is …damaging and oversimplified … but definitely real. At the recent Newsgeist conference – a coming-together of technologists, educators, journalists and executives – one of the most animated sessions was called “Product versus Editorial” and, if there had been an option for us to express ourselves with primal screaming, it would have shattered the windows, such was the frustration of those who have to work with both.

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Light Reading

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Why do readers love to hate the Times’s Style section? While many of its trend pieces are guilty of the same transgressions committed elsewhere in mainstream media, a history of misogyny and homophobia directed at lifestyle journalism suggests our contempt goes beyond objective criticism:

Far from detailing the paper’s ignominious decline into muddy ethical waters and vacuous intellectual territory, the history of style reporting at the New York Times actually exposes some of the nastiest truths about misogyny and homophobia in the mass media: their intensity, their unbelievable durations (by which I mean “totally believable”), their active contemporary manifestations, and the role audiences play in perpetuating them.

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Blind Lie

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Over at The New Republic, Hanna Rosin pens a piece on her buddy, Stephen Glass—former Republic colleague, one-time prodigy, and probably the most lucrative fabricator in recent journalistic history:

I didn’t know when he called me that he’d made up nearly all of the bizarre and amazing stories, that he was the perpetrator of probably the most elaborate fraud in journalistic history, that he would soon become famous on a whole new scale.

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Creativity Is Messy

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Technically perfect writing is important when it comes to journalism or nonfiction, and especially helpful when writing with short deadlines. Fiction writing is different though. Nicole Bernier, over at Beyond the Margins, explains why grammatically sloppy writing might be the product of greater creativity:

Sometimes when creative writers say they don’t notice their own typos, it has a whiff of, well, humblebraggery.

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Oscar Wilde, Journalist

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The famous playwright and novelist Oscar Wilde also spent a number of years in journalism. Scholars John Stokes and Mark W. Turner are finally collecting Wilde’s journalism from the 1880s. Little is known of Wilde’s life at this time, but the articles he left behind reveal Wilde’s varied interests, reports the Times Literary Supplement, and ultimately laid the groundwork for Wilde’s better-known writing in later years:

One of the most rewarding ways of reading Wilde’s journalism is therefore as a giant workshop for the making of the Wilde that readers know better from his more famous writings of the 1890s.

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WWNBD: What Would Nellie Bly Do?

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Two things: First, Alice Gregory’s fascinating account of Nellie Bly’s bold, perennially wry career in journalism—an account that wraps up with a call for female writers to not only write about “women’s issues.”

Second, Ann Friedman responds with a thoughtful defense of making a career writing about “women’s issues.”

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When Journalistic Ethics Aren’t So Ethical

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In the course of writing a story about a golf club, a Grantland journalist named Caleb Hannan discovered that the club’s inventor was a transgender woman. She ended up committing suicide, which, though he doesn’t seem to realize it’s a possibility, could very well be the result of his outing her.

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Bad News for Journalism

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The shape of journalism has been changing rapidly in the past several years, but it still comes as a shock to hear that a media company as dominant as Time Inc. is bulldozing the barrier between business and news.

According to the New York Times, “the newsroom staffs at Time Inc.’s magazines will report to the business executives.

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