Posts Tagged: joyce carol oates

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #124: Anne Raeff

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“I guess that’s true when you write a novel, you end up taking out so much.”

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Notable San Francisco: 2/14–2/20

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Literary events and readings in and around the Bay Area this week!

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Lola StVil

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Lola StVil discusses her latest novel, Girls Like Me, how her characters demand to be written, what her family thinks of her writing career, and why representation is essential.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Carmen Maria Machado

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Carmen Maria Machado discusses her debut story collection, Her Body and Other Parties, her favorite horror writers and movies, and writing the book(s) she’s always wanted to read.

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An Eerie Prescience: Talking with Joyce Carol Oates

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Author Joyce Carol Oates discusses how the political climate affected the writing of her latest novel, A Book of American Martyrs, how she uses Twitter, and why predictions are a waste of time.

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Notable NYC: 9/2–9/8

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Literary events and readings in and around New York City this week!

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #91: Meghan Lamb

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Author Meghan Lamb‘s new novel, Silk Flowers (Birds of Lace, March 2017), is a book that cuts to the core of disturbance. In it, a woman is struck by an inexplicable and undiagnosable illness that renders her immobile and takes away her ability to speak. Her husband must become her caretaker, living with a woman […]

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Notable NYC: 5/27–6/2

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Saturday 5/27: Hossannah Asuncion and Che Gossett join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Tuesday 5/30: Samantha Irby presents her new essay collection We Are Never Meeting in Real Life (our May Book Club selection). Housing Works, 7 p.m., $20.

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Notable San Francisco: 4/12–4/18

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Wednesday 4/12: Douglas Kearney reads for for UC Berkeley’s Holloway Series in Poetry. Free, 6:30 p.m.,  UC Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex. Joyce Carol Oates presents A Book of American Martyrs at Moe’s in Berkeley. It’s always a treat to encounter this author! Free, 7:30 p.m., Moe’s Books. Thursday 4/13: Shanthi Sekaran (Lucky Boy) reads at the Morrison […]

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Storytelling Is a Search: An Interview with Sequoia Nagamatsu

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Sequoia Nagamatsu discusses his debut collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, grief as a character, and the intersection of ancient myth and the modern world.

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Notable San Francisco: 3/8–3/14

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Wednesday 3/8: The Museum of the African Diaspora, as part of their current exhibition Where Is Here (curated by Jacquelyn Francis and Kathy Zarur), celebrate International Women’s Day with a discussion featuring mixed media and installation artist Asya Abdrahman and writers Faith Adiele and Tonya M. Foster. $10, 7 p.m., MOAD. Thi Bui launches her […]

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Notable Los Angeles: 2/27–3/5

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Monday 2/27: Tim Dorsey discusses and signs Clownfish Blues. 7 p.m. at Book Soup. ALOUD presents An Evening with George Saunders. The author discusses his novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, in conversation with author Anthony Marra. Featuring a dramatic reading by Phil LaMarr. 7:30 p.m. in the Writer’s Guild Theater. The event is full, but […]

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #18: Keeping Our Balance in a Time of Turkeys

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Yesterday, walking home along the wet pavement twinkling under the sunshine, I spied a flock of no fewer than twenty-four wild turkeys parading down the street, mostly chicks. I don’t see them today, as the rain has returned, and all is gray. I live on a hill where I can look out the window to […]

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Notable San Francisco: 2/15–2/21

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Wednesday 2/15: Simone White (House Envy of All the World) reads for the Holloway Series at UC Berkeley. Free, 6:30 p.m., UC Berkeley Hearst Annex. Min Jin Lee (Pachinko) reads her novel about generations of a Korean family. Free, 7:30 p.m., The Booksmith. Thursday 2/16: The Poetry Center San Jose presents a reading at San […]

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Notable San Francisco: 2/8–2/14

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Wednesday 2/8: Poet Brandon Brown reads. Free, 7:30 p.m., Moe’s Books. Thursday 2/9: Adam Hochschild, National Book Award Finalist. Free, 5 p.m., Morrison Libray at UC Berkeley.

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The Rumpus Interview with Erik Kennedy

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Poet Erik Kennedy discusses literary community and his formative years as a young writer in New Jersey, and shares two new prose poems.

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All That Is Suggested of Trauma

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At the New York Review of Books, Joyce Carol Oates writes about Shirley Jackson through her seminal story “The Lottery,” her contemporaneous public perception via hate mail, the figure of her presented in literary biographies, the self she expressed in essays and works of memoir, her marriage made in hell, her abuse of powerful psychotropic drugs—amounting […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Maryse Meijer

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Maryse Meijer discusses her debut collection Heartbreaker, the importance of tension in writing, revision as a shield against criticism, and life as a twin.

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The Rumpus Interview with Russell Banks

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Russell Banks discusses his new book, Voyager: Travel Writings, why we are never free from our history, and how writing saved his life.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jane Ciabattari and Grant Faulkner

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Jane Ciabattari, Vice President/Online of the National Book Critics Circle, and Grant Faulkner, NaNoWriMo director and 100 Word Story co-founder, talk flash fiction.

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Notable NYC: 10/10–10/16

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Saturday 10/10: Katie Degentesh and Katy Bohinc join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Christopher Lee, Sarah Thomas, Nathan Myers, Karen Less, Bradman, Nicole Basta, Christian Polanco, Katie Haller, and Padty join the Say Yes series. 1013 Pacific Street, 8 p.m.., free. Monday 10/12: Matt Bell, Lincoln Michel, Merritt Tierce, and Naomi Jackson […]

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On Writing Too Much

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The works of prolific writers are often viewed as less-than-literary, like the largely forgotten books of mystery novelist John Creasey, author of 564 books. Even serious novelists like Joyce Carol Oates, author of more than fifty novels, can write so much they lose the critics’ interest. Semi-prolific author Stephen King (fifty-five novels) looks out how we consider highly […]

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