Posts Tagged: Junot Diaz

asilsolomon

The Rumpus Interview with Asali Solomon

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Asali Solomon discusses her debut novel, Disgruntled, narrative structure, the mythology of memory and place, and returning to Philadelphia after years away. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Manuel Gonzales

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Manuel Gonzales talks about his new novel, The Regional Office is Under Attack!, transitioning from nonprofit work to teaching, and how to zig when a trope wants you to zag. ...more

Vivian Lee

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Vivian Lee

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As an editor of color, one advantage I have is that writers of color are comfortable knowing I’m not asking for edits to artificially enhance or to cover up their race. It’s not weird to me that their characters look like them. ...more

The Conversation

The Conversation: Angel Nafis, Safia Elhillo, and Elizabeth Acevedo

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I don’t think it ever fully sunk in for me that I even live in America. ...more

The Hardest Thing to Survive

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As a kid I was that literal, thinking I lived in fiction, so let me write it. It started there, and it seems it’s going to end there.

In a conversation excerpted from Upstairs at the Strand, Junot Diaz and Hilton Als touch deftly on such subjects as masculinity and its relations to queerness; the failure of realism to capture the truth; the trials of artistic expression in and around Latino culture; familial rejection; and self-deprecating voices in your head.

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Own Your Favorite Author’s Favorite Book

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If you’ve ever wanted an unfiltered glimpse into the inner life of your favorite author, celebrity, or athlete, new philanthropic project Read by Famous gives you that chance. Artist Josh Greene, the project’s organizer, has gathered more than 100 copies of well-read, well-loved, and much commented-in books by authors such as Junot Diaz and Eileen Myles, as well as CEOs, celebrities, athletes, famous Canadians, and more.

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jennifer Baker

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The more variation we see in life, the more it becomes less about seeing one type of book by marginalized people. ...more

Diaz Urges Readers to Diversify

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For the Huffington Post, Carolina Moreno discusses Junot Diaz’s recent appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers, where the award-winning author stressed the importance of reading authors from diverse backgrounds:

You look at this country and you look at this world and you need to understand it in complex ways… And part of that complexity is, of course, questions of gender: If you don’t want to deal and relate and think about what it means to be a woman in this planet— you’re going to have serious problems.

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Junot Diaz Talks Reading, Books, and Race

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In a short interview with the Los Angeles Times, Junot Diaz discusses how he chooses what works to read at events, some books he’s reading now and loving, and America’s uncanny ability to erase racial struggle from its collective mind:

I think that we’re in another moment where historically, periodically issues of race and the kind of panorama in which we live becomes more clear and comes into focus.

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ALVAR_Photo Credit Deborah Lopez

The Rumpus Interview with Mia Alvar

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Author Mia Alvar discusses her debut short story collection, In the Country, fictional motherhood, literature’s role in society, and the limits of belonging to a place. ...more

Rigoberto Gonzalez

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Rigoberto González

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Rigoberto González about his new book Our Lady of the Crossword, cover image censorship, and the BP oil disaster. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Daniel José Older

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Author Daniel José Older talks about his new novel, Shadowshaper, noir influence in urban fantasy, gentrification, white privilege and the publishing industry, and why we need diverse books, now more than ever. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Skip Horack

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Skip Horack talks about his new novel, The Other Joseph, blending research with fiction, and living with the “curse of the fiction writer.” ...more

Not So Brief and Completely Wondrous

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Over at Gawker, Jason Parham leads us to an extremely long and incredibly detailed interview with Junot Diaz:

“When as a young person you lose all your bearings, all your reference points, when the gap between where you were and where you are is as vast as the one that yawned between the DR and the US, you’re going to struggle mightily to explain not only what happened but also to explain oneself.

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Famous Authors: They’re Just Like Us!

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For T Magazine, seven authors reflect on the experience of revisiting and annotating their early works for an upcoming PEN American Center fundraiser. George Saunders thinks his style in CivilWarLand in Bad Decline was “manic and abrupt.” Jennifer Egan still regrets that she failed to include an Epic poetry chapter in A Visit From the Goon Squad.

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Chipping at Wonder Woman

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Samuel “Chip” Delany’s penned the landmark 800 page science fiction tri-sexual space novel, any number of short stories set through all corners of the galaxy, and a craft book Junot Diaz calls “a measure of what all criticism and literature should aspire to be, but what you might not know is that he also wrote for Wonder Woman:.

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Fine the Way You Are

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Homogeneity in the literary scene isn’t a recent development. Earlier this year, Junot Diaz caused a stir by branding the unbearable too-whiteness of his workshop experience. Justin Torres and Ayana Mathis couldn’t help but contribute:

“One of the characters is sort of referred to as having something like almond skin, something that would identify the character as black.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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The news of Michael Brown’s death cannot be ignored. When one of our young people dies from shots fired by a police officer, there will be sadness and confusion. There will inevitably be questions, and questions left unanswered will lead to anger. 

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Our Voices Are Voices Too

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In the 1990s, Junot Diaz enrolled in an MFA program where there was silence when it came to critical discussions of racial identity. As Diaz writes in the New Yorker, “Shit, in my workshop we never talked about race except on the rare occasion someone wanted to argue that ‘race discussions’ were exactly the discussion a serious writer should not be having.” In this sentiment, there was a refusal to truly acknowledge the lives and cultures of certain groups of people.

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