Posts Tagged: Kathleen Rooney

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, the Picasso Blues.

This weekend’s reviews included a revealing summary of Bonnie Zobell’s book, What Happened Here, by Anna March, and Jac Jemc’s collection, A Different Bed Every Time. In the former, Zobell employs a cast of characters from the North Park area of San Diego to give us a “tremendously well-written take on trying to understand that which we can never know about what shapes a life…” Then, Heather Partington shares some insights into the “beautiful and complex” stories of Jac Jemc.

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National Poetry Month Day 11: “The History of Asterisks” by Elisa Gabbert and Kathleen Rooney

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The History of Asterisks

It is midnight under the sky’s dome ceiling.
The moon speaks, saying nothing of consequence.
John Wayne is from Iowa, so we hitchhiked West
and I realized I never really loved you.
Your skepticism of scientific indices of happiness
is probably gendered or otherwise distorted.

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“Who the Hell Cares About Anne Sexton’s Grandmother?”

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When we read a piece of fiction, we don’t assume—or at least we know we’re not supposed to assume—it’s a faithful recreation of an event in the author’s life. But what about when we read a poem?

For Poetry, Kathleen Rooney writes about realizing Brian Russell’s poems about a wife’s terminal illness were not actually about the real-life Mrs.

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“Southern Wind, Clear Sky”: A Rumpus Original Poem by Elisa Gabbert and Kathleen Rooney

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Southern Wind, Clear Sky

Hokusai says the morning is clear, but it’s never really clear around Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji is an active volcano, so we can never get entirely comfortable
People have their theories, but nobody knows for sure what the Fuji part of the name Mount Fuji actually means
Mount Fuji may not be red, but children will tell you the sky isn’t blue
In Japan, traffic lights are considered to be red, yellow, and “blue,” whether one is near Mount Fuji or not
The closer you get to Mount Fuji, the more unattainable it seems
Hokusai did 36 woodblock print views of Mount Fuji, but was never fully satisfied
This particular woodblock is a study in treeline and stratus over Mount Fuji
When the wind hits Mount Fuji from the south, the eye becomes restless
Those near Mount Fuji have longer life spans, but not because of their proximity to the mountain
The trees on Mount Fuji in the 1700s have been replaced by crowds of climbers in the 21st century
The rivulets, the rivulets on Mount Fuji are snow, not ash, I assure you
What if I told you no one has ever looked into the top of Mount Fuji?
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The Rumpus Books Sunday Supplement

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In my (wow, it’s already been almost a) year here as Sunday editor at The Rumpus, I’ve never seen a week with so much incredible content. If you missed it, come take a peek.

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