Posts Tagged: Langston Hughes

The Rumpus Interview with Joe Ide

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Joe Ide discusses his debut novel, IQ his writing process, and why he enjoys fly fishing. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jacqueline Woodson

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Jacqueline Woodson discusses her latest novel Another Brooklyn, the little deaths of lost friendships, and her work with children across the country as the Poetry Foundation's Young People's Poet Laureate. ...more

Color at the Mercy of the Light

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What if I said: while people still believe they are white in America, that delusion, and the dream upon which it is founded, needs to be seriously examined. ...more

America Again

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I felt urgently that it was the moment to tell the story of what I’ve learned about American music—or maybe about being an American. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 1): “The Idea of Ancestry”

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I know / their dark eyes, they know mine. ...more

Save Langston Hughes’s Harlem Home

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Award-winning author Renée Watson is fighting to save the house that Langston Hughes lived in through much of the 1950s and 60s, until his death in 1967, Heather Long reports for CNN. Watson launched an Indiegogo campaign to rescue the brownstone and preserve its literary history—donate here today to make sure we don’t lose this important piece of American poetry’s past.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Rion Amilcar Scott

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Rion Amilcar Scott discusses his new collection Insurrections, creating a fictional town, and the pressure to make religious decisions during puberty. ...more

“Seven People Dancing”

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The New Yorker hosted a discussion about a previously unpublished Langston Hughes short story with Arnold Rampersand, who wrote a two-volume biography of the Harlem Renaissance poet, and first discovered the unpublished story thirty years ago. The story, “Seven People Dancing,” explores themes of sexuality and expression:

I think that his cruelly comic, or comically cruel, vision of humanity is at play here in a dominant way.

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Black and White Portraits from the Harlem Renaissance

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Van Vechten took to Zora Neale Hurston and especially to Langston Hughes. Biographies tell us that Hughes didn’t doubt Van Vechten’s sincerity, but he worried nevertheless how their connection would look in Harlem. Countee Cullen would eventually sit for Van Vechten, but in the 1920s, as a young black poet who believed he could write a lyric poetry that was color-blind, an escape from race, he kept his distance from the man who was already controversial as a white patron of black artists.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: The Poet’s Journey: Chapter 10

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Becoming a poet means locating what images and symbols, what argument and figuration, are best suited to convey the aspects of change you most want to reveal through your writing. ...more

Staving-off-Despair Roundup

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When there’s an injustice as great a man walking free after killing an unarmed teenager, at least we have writing to turn to.

Our essays editor Roxane Gay has done some of that writing for Salon in a piece about the George Zimmerman trial titled “Racism is every American’s problem.”An essay or an Op-Ed won’t solve anything,” she says.

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