Posts Tagged: language

Vocabulary Lessons in Bucharest

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I felt unhinged in my moments of isolation, and frustrated in my muteness. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Erik Kennedy

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Poet Erik Kennedy discusses literary community and his formative years as a young writer in New Jersey, and shares two new prose poems. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Rosalie Moffett

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Rosalie Moffett discusses her new collection June in Eden, writing humor in poetry, using contemporary references, and trying to understand the world. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Chris Santiago

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Chris Santigo on his new collection Tula, writing a multilingual text, and the connections between music and writing poetry. ...more

My Voice for Their Drugs

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Anxiety disorients me from inside. My heart moves so erratically I’m afraid it will give out, my breath so staggered I have to remind myself to take in air. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Iben Mondrup and Kerri Pierce

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Iben Mondrup and Kerri Pierce discuss the translation of Justine, Mondrup's 2012 Danish novel about a young artist in Denmark. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Such a Thing

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The future perfect tense indicates an action that is certain to occur. But when the future is not perfect or certain, the conditional “would” is more appropriate. ...more

Fitting Characters and Scripts

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Unwittingly, my mother teaches me in this conversation her generation’s word for gay: 同性恋. I look it up in an online dictionary, three characters in my mother’s tongue. Same, sex, and love. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Vi Khi Nao

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Vi Khi Nao on her new novel Fish in Exile, why women shouldn't apologize (even when they're wrong), moving between genres, and why humor is vital in a novel full of darkness and grief. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Never Let Me Go

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"You can’t hold on to the past," Elif once told me. "You don’t know how. You don’t know what to keep, what to throw away. So you keep it all. And you can’t do that. No one can." ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Adam Morris

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Adam Morris discusses Quiet Creature on the Corner, a novel he translated from the Brazilian by João Gilberto Noll, the choices he makes as a translator, and the unique narrative structure of Noll’s writing. ...more

Exclamation Points Are Feminist!

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Friendly emails are a sign of progress, not weakness, in our working lives.

Policing women’s use of language is over (we wish). But at the Huffington Post, Angelina Chapin argues that women’s use of exclamation marks in the workplace represents a subversion of masculinist notions about leadership.

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“A Star That Peers Through Your Window”

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German children’s book author Thomas Mac Pfeifer spent over a year interviewing children who had migrated to Germany from war-stricken countries such as Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan with the purpose of hearing and collecting their favorite bedtime stories into one book, Ein Stern, der in dein Fenster schaut (“A star that peers through your window”).

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Janice N. Harrington

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Janice N. Harrington on her new collection Primitive and critiquing the use of "primitive" to describe African American folk art. ...more

A Study of Homeland in Displacement

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To think of Brazil as a different place than I remember it is to think of my unbelonging, as someone out of place in my memory. ...more

Defining Writing

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For JSTOR Daily, Chi Luu examines the long-conflicting ideas of whether writing is a form of technology or a separate dialect of its spoken form. Luu references the upcoming film Arrival and the sci-fi novella it’s based on, Ted Chiang’s The Story of Your Life, which takes a linguist’s point of view in telling its story of a human-alien first encounter.

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Shakespeare Didn’t Make up as Many Words as We Think

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For the Guardian, Alison Flood writes on the bias of the Oxford English Dictionary towards “famous literary examples” instead of the actual origin, resulting in the incorrect attribution of several still-used words and phrases to Shakespeare. Flood writes that there are multitudes of evidence showing earlier usages of phrases such as “wild goose chase” and “it’s Greek to me,” citing Shakespearean scholar Dr.

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The Endangered List

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The Dictionary of American Regional English, or DARE, has launched a campaign to save fifty words and phrases it deems are dying from lack of use, reports Alison Flood for the Guardian:

Although language change is inevitable, it’s too bad to see some of our most colourful expressions going out of use,” said Joan Hall, former editor of DARE.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Pain Scale Treaties

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Perched on the shoulders of generational trauma sit these two theses: suffering begets cruelty begets suffering begets cruelty, and pain is empathy’s catalyst. ...more