Posts Tagged: Larissa Pham

Notable NYC: 9/16–9/22

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Literary events and readings in and around New York City this week! ...more

Notable NYC: 5/6–5/12

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Saturday 5/6: Jennifer E. Smith presents Windfall. McNally Jackson Books, 6 p.m., free.

Carmen Giménez Smith and Aldrin Valdez join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5.

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Notable NYC: 3/11–3/17

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Saturday 3/11: Carolyn Hembree, Neil Shepard, and Terese Svoboda read poetry. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 7 p.m., free.

Chris Tysh and Cole Swensen join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5.

Sunday 3/12: Joshua Mohr discusses his memoir Sirens with Charles Bock.

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The Truth of Brushstrokes or Brushstrokes of Truth?

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Autofiction is in these days. Discussing her first novel Fantasian at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop’s The Margins blog, Larissa Pham unpacks her perspective on inserting autobiographical elements into fiction:

I knew that no matter what I wrote in my novella, given my history of truth-telling, there would be an implication that it was true.

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The Ivy Halls of Racism

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Larissa Pham writes about racism and Yale for Guernica:

This tension is not new. It is a product of the systemic racism built into the institution, as ubiquitous as the architecture that characterizes the place in our shared consciousness. “Everyone who enters Yale is reminded that they’re in an environment that is a product of centuries of classism and racism,” Cynthia Hua, who graduated earlier this year, told me.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, a little creative encouragement from Grant Snider to jump start August.

Then, in this review, Andrew Fulmer examines Jeff Alessandrelli’s use of the poetic “factoid.” Alessandrelli makes a series of successful allusions in his collection, This Last Time Will Be The First

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“Ginger Is Good For Taking Care of Yourself”

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“It feels like cheating,” Larissa Pham says in a Gawker essay titled “In My Shopping Cart,” “to write about culture by writing about food.”

But it reads like anything but cheating. Pham wheels us through the grocery aisles of her memory, pointing out the Vietnamese food her family made with American ingredients, childhood treats with forgotten names, and the unexpected privilege of growing up with first-generation American cuisine.

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