Posts Tagged: Lit Hub

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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The Guardian looks at how an Australian feminist bookstore took on MRA trolls.

Two Dollar Radio, a Columbus-based independent publisher, plans to open a bookstore.

A community bookstore in Amman, Jordan that charged a pay-what-you-can fee for books nearly went bankrupt, but was saved by crowdfunding from around the world.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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We’re halfway through June, and though the first day of summer isn’t technically until June 21, I think we can all agree that we’re well into the sweltering season. This week’s story captures those quintessential staples of summer—swimming pools, soft serve, bike rides, frozen Capri Suns—but it’s no typical poolside read.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, Canadian-British author Alison MacLeod mixes fiction with fact and memoir with metaphysics in a short story about a visit to Sylvia Plath’s grave. At Lit Hub, “Sylvia Wears Pink in the Underworld” takes what could otherwise be an item on a tourist’s agenda or an assignment in a ninth grade English class and transmutes it into a piece of writing that walks the edge of beauty and darkness as it pays homage to one of literature’s most mysterious and tragic celebrities.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, a short story collection written by an author in North Korea and smuggled across its borders is reaching readers in North America. The Accusation is the first known story collection written by an author still living inside the totalitarian state to have escaped its iron curtain, and it is now being published across the globe.

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The Rumpus Interview with Joshua Mohr

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Joshua Mohr discusses his memoir Sirens, writing for his daughter, and why he values art that trusts its audience. ...more

This Week in Essays

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For Guernica, Carmen Maria Machado writes about cultural myths around large women and fighting to take up space with her body and her mind.

Woe be to those who buy the Peggy couch. Anna Hezel pens a hilarious “buyer beware” at The Awl.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Rosalie Moffett

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Rosalie Moffett discusses her new collection June in Eden, writing humor in poetry, using contemporary references, and trying to understand the world. ...more

This Week in Essays

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Last week was horrible and you need a laugh. Read Kate Washington’s imagined revolutionary National Parks meeting at McSweeney’s.

For Longreads, Anjali Enjeti tackles her perceived outsider status, even as a first-generation American-born citizen.

Read Davey Davis’s compelling dissection of the body horror genre here at The Rumpus.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jade Sharma

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Jade Sharma discusses her first novel Problems, the complicated feelings that came with debuting to rave reviews, and her writing and editing processes. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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An eight-time Jeopardy! winner is turning the cash into his dream: a bookstore.

City Lights in San Francisco is offering up a special section featuring resistance literature.

Bookstores in Washington, DC supported the Women’s March and hosted events through inauguration weekend.

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AWP 2017 Offsite: Write Together, Fight Together

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Don’t miss our 2017 AWP offsite event, co-hosted with Barrelhouse, Catapult, and Lit Hub!

Write Together, Fight Together will include readings from: Jericho Brown, Nicole Dennis-Benn, Melissa Febos, Morgan Parker, and Sarah Sweeney, to be followed by music and dancing. Free admission, February 9, 2017, doors at 6:30 p.m., readings begin at 7 p.m.

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This Week in Essays

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Bookbinding may be a dying art, but at Lit Hub, Dwyer Murphy tells the story of a man who keeps his business going strong on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

For Hazlitt, Suzannah Showler takes a measured look at the prepper community and at the idea of preparation itself.

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The Rumpus Interview with Terry McDonell

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Terry McDonell talks about his new memoir The Accidental Life and his career in the magazine business, which spans the beginning of New Journalism through the digital revolution. ...more

This Week in Essays

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Here at The Rumpus, this essay by Liz Latty on challenging the fairy tale myth of adoption is receiving a tremendous response from readers.

Malloy Owen has written a mind-opening essay for The Point providing a valuable perspective that challenges liberals to reexamine liberalism.

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Feminism and Silence’s Uneasy Relationship

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Silence sometimes can protect you. It’s easy to think of the one who “saves herself,” who hides in the closet while the rest of the family is raped and killed by men in uniform. But silence can also protect others: when you face down demands to confess or condemn, when you refuse to sing for the master, when you speak not at all rather than speak the words they’ve scripted for you.

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The Life and Times of Black Clock Magazine

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The legendary Black Clock has been retired. At Lit Hub, novelist Bruce Bauman, author most recently of Broken Sleep, recounts the magazine’s history in a conversation with Jeff VanderMeer:

From the very beginning when Jon Wagner had hired Steve to start the magazine, it was clear the vison, the content—all final decisions would be Steve’s.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Sometimes, literary magazines fold. It happens all the time because of funding, or manpower, or editorial differences. Usually, print back issues remain for sale and online content is preserved indefinitely, or at least until someone forgets to renew the domain. But this does not seem to be the case with Black Clock, the respected literary magazine out of CalArts that published the likes of David Foster Wallace, Jonathan Lethem, and Aimee Bender, to name only a few of the prominent talents from its pages.

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All Talk, No Action

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Marlon James, author of A Brief History of Seven Killings, pens an essay for Lit Hub pointing out the meagerness of diversity as a meaningful end goal for creative communities. He critiques the repeated use of diversity panels, as they merely benchmark the fact that we have not even managed bring that small goal to fruition and remain heavily reliant on the efforts and labors of writers of color:

The problem with me coming to the table to talk about diversity is the belief that I have some role to play in us accomplishing it, and I don’t.

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Arendt on Trump

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Evil is not one man, but rather the process of normalization via which exclusion, deportation, and finally extermination are all rendered morally justifiable.

At Lit Hub, Rafia Zakaria writes an essay about Donald Trump’s rampant Islamophobia and how it can be read as emblematic of the evil Hannah Arendt theorized about in Eichmann in Jerusalum.

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