Posts Tagged: Los Angeles Review of Books

Fame and Literature, Irreconcilable Enemies

By

Reflecting on what might become of Roberto Bolaño, and his fame, John Yargo covers two biographies of the Chilean writer for the Los Angeles Review of Books, noting that these scholars had to “face a unique problem”:

The seductive popular image of [Bolaño]—something like a better-read Burroughs—is at odds with the voice of his fiction and his essays, which tends to be more generous, expansive, and penetrating than his image suggests.

...more

ows_14086601547905

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Tuesday, Tony Earley released a new collection of stories, Mr. Tall. Two decades have passed since Earley’s debut collection, Here We Are in Paradise, and though he has released two novels and a memoir since that time, for short fiction addicts (and lovers of southern writing), the publication of a new book of stories is big news.

...more

Feminism Today

By

At the Los Angeles Review of Books, editor and founder of Bookslut.com Jessa Crispin writes on feminism in its contemporary incarnation by way of two recent critiques of 50 Shades of Grey. She draws a distinction between feminism (a discourse) and feminism (a table-turning form of social domination) wherein “The bullied become the bullies [and the] abused become the abusers.”

Any sort of societal critique is thrown at a patriarchal straw man, as if all we have to do is get 50 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs to be female and an equal number of female bylines at The New York Times to have a better world.

...more

I’m Emily Dickinson! Who Are You?

By

For her “The Poems (We Think) We Know” column at the Los Angeles Review of Books, Alexandra Socarides writes about Emily Dickinson’s celebrated “I’m Nobody! Who are you?,” debunking its commonly held interpretation:

There is a seemingly stark private/public dichotomy laid out by the poem’s two stanza structure.

...more

A Multimedia Dig

By

In their first joint project, The Los Angeles Review of Books and Los Angeles Magazine recently released what they call a “multimedia collaborative story,” Geoff Nicholas Maps a Territory. The piece supplements the release of Nicholson’s new novel, The City Under the Skin, and it documents—in print, video, and photographs—a walk taken by the author and his friend, critic Anthony Miller, “to explore a series of urban ruins” allegedly “hidden in plain sight,” all the way from the Hollywood Walk of Fame to Joan Didion’s old residence.

...more

“Black to the Future”

By

Black to the future was/is a radical, dangerous, and daring dream—an impossibility. Science fiction and fantasy (sf&f) is a rehearsal of the impossible, an ideal realm for redefinition and reinvention. For Africans and their descendants in the diaspora, decolonizing our mind/body/spirits was/is an on-going sf&f project.

...more

The Lowdown on Queer Feminist Comics

By

“Sexuality is more than gay and straight, and probably even more than LGBTQIA. Comics are here to help.” So read the delightful subhed for Greg Baldino’s LARB review of two anthologies of comics about gender and sexuality.

The books are The Big Feminist But and Anything That Loves, and though he’s frustrated by certain limitations, he also finds much to praise, including a comic by our very own MariNaomi.

...more

Women Writing Weird Words

By

Somewhere between its Kmart and hysterical phases, literary realism got shaken up, when a group of young women writers began crafting a spectral brand of fantastical, strange fiction….Permeating the stories is a sense of omnipresent strangeness made visible.

The Los Angeles Review of Books has a great piece on “our current bumper crop” of women writing—choose your favorite term—magical realism or speculative fiction or just really cool weird stuff.

...more

Brave New World & California

By

It’s often said “The Sixties” officially began with the death of JFK and America’s “loss of innocence.” But without the dedicated and well-documented cosmic explorations of Aldous Huxley and his cohorts, the decade would have looked very different.

Steffie Nelson retraces the notable life and work of the Aldous Huxley after he moved to California in a brilliant essay over at the Los Angeles Review of Books.

...more

“Every Narrative Voice Is a Fiction”

By

Some years ago I attended a [Margaret Atwood] reading….She introduced the story she read by saying that it was not autobiographical. Then she read her story about a woman who weighed somewhere in the vicinity of 300 pounds. When she was done, and the Q&A started, the first question was: “Miss Atwood, how did you lose all that weight?”

The Los Angeles Review of Books has a fascinating interview with several writers, including our very own David Biespiel, about the wriggly nature of truth in writing of any genre, whether it’s fiction, nonfiction, poetry, memoir—anything.

...more

In Which Dead Things Live

By

“What Kafka is to imprisonment and Beckett is to waiting, Schulz is to trash. Not just trash, but stuff — detritus, objects, substances, matter in all its welter and confusion. The whole spectrum of useless, obsolete junk that fills every corner of the world is present and animate in his work — but why?”

Rumpus contributor Jacob Mikanowski explores the role of decay in Polish author Bruno Schulz’s fiction, and finds parallels in the photography of Czech Surrealist Jindřich Štyrský.

...more