Posts Tagged: Margaret Atwood

The Winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Goes to… Kenny G

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Rumpus editors share our Nobel Prize in Literature predictions with you! ...more

Between Autonomy and Powerlessness: Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

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Women’s bodies signify so much, both to ourselves and others, that inhabiting them and having ownership over them often feel like two different states of being. ...more

What to Read When You Want to See a World More F**ked up Than Ours

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Reading suggestions from author Celeste Ng for these f**ked-up times: worlds more—or, okay, just differently—f**ked up than ours. ...more

Saying What Shouldn’t Be Said: A Conversation with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, why writing about teenage girls is the most serious thing in the world, and finding truths in fiction. ...more

What to Read When the President Decides It’s “Time to Exit Paris”

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Turn off the television and pick up a book. You'll feel better for it, we promise. ...more

A Recommended Reading List for Trump’s America

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We asked nineteen authors what books they'd suggest as recommended reading in light of America's new political reality. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Dipika Mukherjee

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Telling a human story, with individuals experiencing the effects of an actual political issue—that’s my part in shaking the ground. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Robert Glancy

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Robert Glancy discusses his sophomore novel, Please Do Not Disturb, growing up under a dictatorship, borrowing and stealing from reality, and his love of proverbs. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jaimee Wriston Colbert

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Life’s inequities can be cruel, but in the end we are all part of our communities; suffering though we may be, we are not alone. ...more

The Handmaid’s (Cautionary) Tale

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At The Establishment, Laura Beans discusses the importance of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale as a predictive novel, drawing many connections between the novel and increasing attempts to control women’s bodies:

Instead of seeming further from the truth, the novel’s warnings only seem to echo louder in recent years.

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Like Tears in Rain

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In a universe slowly sinking into entropy, writing can take the disordered pieces of our experience and fit their edges together into something organized. If the work of a writer is to tease out meaning from the tangled mess of life, many of these algorithms essentially do the opposite, taking meaningful human posts or experiences and reducing them to their barest reportable facts.

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All That We Could Do with This Emotion

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Writing for the Guardian, novelist Val McDermid disputes the recent study which suggests that “literary” fiction readers are more empathetic than “genre” readers:

There is no doubt that, historically, there was a valid distinction. Nobody would attempt to suggest that there is an equivalence between Agatha Christie and Virginia Woolf.

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Make Me Believe

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The response to [the Handmaid’s Tale] was interesting. The English, who had already had their religious civil war, said, “Jolly good yarn.” The Canadians in their nervous way, said, “Could it happen here?” And the Americans said, “How long have we got?”

For Lit Hub, Grant Munroe interviews Margaret Atwood on seemingly everything, touching on the Salem witch trials, Donald Trump, Canada as a place of refuge, and some of her million projects: Hag-seed, her adaptation of The Tempest; her graphic novel Angel Catbird; and the forthcoming Hulu adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale, among others.

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Google vs. Author’s Guild

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The fight against Google’s digital library continues, and this time the effort has support from big-name authors like Margaret Atwood, Ursula K. Le Guin, Malcolm Gladwell, Peter Carey, and J. M. Coetzee. The case against Google making millions of books—many of them still under copyright protection—searchable online without paying for any licenses to do so goes back to 2005. 

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Writers Versus Censorship and Repression

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For the Guardian, Sian Cain reports on recent efforts from high-profile writers to push China to release Nobel Laureate and poet Liu Xiaobo from prison. According to Cain, Xiaobo was detained for “inciting subversion of state power,” and his supporters, including Margaret Atwood and Ian Rankin, hope he will be released by the seventh anniversary of his arrest.

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Margaret and the No Good, Very Bad Prison

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We know some of the things we desire are probably not what we should do. That’s what makes drama interesting.

Anshuman Iddamsetty sat down with Margaret Atwood to talk about her new book, The Heart Goes Last, and the conversation includes but is not limited to: the for-profit prison industrial complex, thirsty men, peeling back layers to expose human excretions, sexual violence, the grand human story, empathy, and baking.

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An Experiment in Fiction

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Atwood says this is not the time for realistic fiction — and it’s no coincidence that dystopia and fantasy are on the rise now. “I think they’re coming out of people’s feeling that things are going haywire, and you cannot depend on a stable background for ‘realistic fiction.’ And when there’s perceived instability that’s happening you can’t write that kind of novel and have people believe it.”

In a conversation with NPR, Margaret Atwood talks about her new novel, The Heart Goes Last, a book which NPR describes as difficult to define.

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Humpty Dumpty, the Original Mansplainer

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I can explain all the poems that were ever invented—and a good many that haven’t been invented yet.

No, that’s not the obnoxious guy from your Wallace Stevens seminar—that’s Lewis Carroll’s Humpty Dumpty, explaining “Jabberwocky” to Alice. Let Evan Kindley take you down the rabbit hole of literary annotation over at The New Republic—and for a contemporary examples, check out Margaret Atwood’s Genius annotation of an excerpt from her latest novel, The Heart Goes Last, at Lit Hub, or this excerpt from Scott Blackwood’s See How Small right here on The Rumpus.

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Rewrite, Reboot, Remix

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Rewriting the classics has become a stale and risk-averse strategy. But that shouldn’t spoil the fun of our larger culture of remixing. ...more

Atwood’s Magical Slumbering Book

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“There’s something magical about it,” says Atwood. “It’s like Sleeping Beauty. The texts are going to slumber for 100 years and then they’ll wake up, come to life again. It’s a fairytale length of time. She slept for 100 years.”

Margaret Atwood delivers her new novel, Scribbler Moon, to the wood-lined Future Library in Norway where it will slumber for 100 years, before being shared with the world.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week was the third annual #TwitterFiction Festival, held here, there, and everywhere in typical Twitter style. The Association of American Publishers and Penguin Random House partnered to host the event this year, bringing in such big names as Margaret Atwood (@MargaretAtwood), Celeste Ng (@pronounced_ing), Eric Jerome Dickey (@EricJDickey), Jackie Collins (@JackieCollins), and Maggie Stiefvater (@mstiefvater).

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The Rumpus Interview with Robert Repino

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Robert Repino talks about his debut novel, Mort(e), the publishing industry, science fiction and literary fiction, writing about religion, and how to write about complex chemical ant languages. ...more