Posts Tagged: mario vargas llosa

Every Woman Is a Nation unto Herself: A Conversation with Sabina Murray

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Sabina Murray discusses the novel Valiant Gentleman, writing characters that are fundamentally different from herself, and confronting issues of colonization.

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The Translator of Great Male Novelists™

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For VICE’s Broadly, Alicia Kennedy interviews Natasha Wimmer, Spanish translator extraordinaire, on her life as a translator of Great Male Novelists™ like Roberto Bolaño, Mario Vargas Llosa, and most recently Álvaro Enrigue. They discuss what makes translation rewarding, anxiety-inducing, and powerful all at once.

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Powerhouse Spanish Literary Agent Remembered

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The New Yorker has a retrospective on Carmen Balcells, a Spanish literary agent who brought writers like Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Jorge Luis Borges to international fame. Balcells passed away last week at the age of 85. Balcells wasn’t just behind the books being written, she was actually in them—sometimes romanticized, sometimes villainized, […]

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Now and Then

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At the Telegraph, Mario Vargas Llosa drops some wisdom on the state of literature: “I remember when I was young,” he continues, “to have a literary or artistic vocation was really dramatic, because you were so isolated from the common world. You felt that you were marginal, and if you dared to try to organize […]

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Mario Vargas Llosa: Artist or Politician?

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In advance of the release of Mario Vargas Llosa’s new book The Time of the Hero, Thomas Mallon investigates the relationship between the Noble Prize-winning author’s work and the political movements of his native Peru. The article focuses on Llosa’s realist style during a time when more experimental Latin American authors were obtaining international prestige, and highlights the author’s […]

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Mario Vargas Llosa and the Sort of Book You’d Sacrifice a Sandal For

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A few months ago my wife and I spent a day on Isla Colon—one of Panama’s Bocas del Toro islands in the Caribbean—where three different men asked if I wanted marijuana. When I told them no, they’d ask the obvious follow-up question: coke?

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Sean Carman: The Last Book I Loved, Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter

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Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, Mario Vargas Llosa’s 1977 novel, begins with an epigraph–a quote from Salvador Elizondo’s The Graphographer–about the watery line between reality and its representation in language. “I write,” it begins. “I write that I am writing. Mentally I see myself writing that I am writing and I can also see myself […]

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