Posts Tagged: marlon james

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Brooke C. Obie

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Brooke C. Obie discusses the historical basis for her debut novel, Book of Addis, writing to dismantle white supremacy, and why Black speculative fiction is integral to her survival. ...more

Notable Twin Cities: 8/6–8/12

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Sunday 8/6: In association with the current exhibit at the James J. Hill House, Joan Mathison will present a free talk on “Our Little Greenwich Village (or Montmartre) on Fourth Street,” as part of the [email protected] series. James J. Hill House, 4:30 p.m., free.

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What We’re Reading in July!

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We’re super excited to share that our July Book Club selection is New People by Danzy Senna! From the bestselling author of Caucasia, New People is a subversive and engrossing novel about race, class, and manners in contemporary America. Heartbreaking and darkly comic, New People is a bold and unfettered page-turner that challenges our every assumption about how we define one another, and ourselves.

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Notable Twin Cities: 4/2–4/8

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Sunday 4/2: The Loft presents Second Story with Duchess Harris and Caren Stelson. Second Story is the Loft’s reading series for young adult and middle-grade authors. Open Book, 2 p.m., free.

E.V. James will be signing copies of her new children’s fantasy adventure The Wish. 

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The Rumpus Interview with Rion Amilcar Scott

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Rion Amilcar Scott discusses his story collection Insurrections, father relationships, hip-hop, knowing when to abandon a project, and choosing not to workshop certain stories. ...more

All Talk, No Action

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Marlon James, author of A Brief History of Seven Killings, pens an essay for Lit Hub pointing out the meagerness of diversity as a meaningful end goal for creative communities. He critiques the repeated use of diversity panels, as they merely benchmark the fact that we have not even managed bring that small goal to fruition and remain heavily reliant on the efforts and labors of writers of color:

The problem with me coming to the table to talk about diversity is the belief that I have some role to play in us accomplishing it, and I don’t.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Louise Erdrich

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The esteemed author talks about the themes of justice, atonement, and reparation in her fifteenth novel, LaRose, and about the importance of Planned Parenthood to her success. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Manuel Gonzales

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Manuel Gonzales talks about his new novel, The Regional Office is Under Attack!, transitioning from nonprofit work to teaching, and how to zig when a trope wants you to zag. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: A Roundtable on Writing, Editing, and Race

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With Lisa Factora-Borchers, Patrice Gopo, Jennifer Niesslein, Tamiko Nimura, and Deesha Philyaw. ...more

White Women Dominate Publishing?

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Man Booker prize-winner Marlon James was right: the people who work in publishing are overwhelmingly white and female. New data shows that publishing executives, editors, and the staff behind books are predominantly white women:

At the executive level, publishing is 86 percent white, 59 percent female, 89 percent “straight/heterosexual,” and 96 percent normatively-abled.

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In Her Own Words

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Over at NPR, authors Claire Vaye Watkins and Marlon James talk about Watkins’s recent essay, “On Pandering,” which she describes as:

…internalizing the sexism that I’d encountered in the writing world, and the world beyond, and adjusting what I wrote accordingly so that it would be more well-received … by the people I wanted to impress, which was a white male voice that I had in my mind.

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On Pandering—to White Women

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For the Guardian, Sian Cain investigates Marlon James’s recent series of criticisms that accuse publishers of “pandering to white women.” James, the 2015 Man Booker prize winner, has been particularly vocal about the subject on social media. In a recent Facebook post, James wrote:

“If I pandered to a cultural tone set by white women, particularly older white female critics, I would have had 10 stories published by now,” he continued.

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An Exercise in Failure

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I did give it up. I actually destroyed the manuscript, I even went on my friends computers and erased it.” He said he retrieved the text by searching in the email outbox of an old iMac computer.

Marlon James, who recently won the Man Booker Prize for A Brief History of Seven Killings, tells the Guardian how having his first manuscript rejected seventy-eight times before getting published almost made him quit writing.

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Kinky Reggae

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Kima Jones chats with Marlon James over at Midnight Breakfast; the two touch on ghost stories, Bob Marley’s reverberations, and the danger in assuming a story’s authenticity:

Some of the things that people think are invented are actually true. It’s also this thing that Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks about with “The Danger of a Single Story,” where we think one person is the sum total of one thing.

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A Brief History of James

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Brook Stephenson’s nabbed an interview with Marlon James—the two chat about Salman Rushdie, the black hobbit argument, and the difference between The Book You Want to Write and The Book You Think You Should Write:

“I read lots of great books, but that was the book when I said, “All right that’s it, I got to write.” I think, for me, there’s The Book I Should Write and The Book I Wanted to Write—and they weren’t the same book.

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