Posts Tagged: Mental Health

Disease Cloaked in Ambition: Gorilla and the Bird by Zack McDermott

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Gorilla and the Bird is an important resource for anyone impacted by the scope of bipolar disorder, as well as those who want to learn more about it. ...more

Slush Piles in White

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The sensibilities of whiteness do not want us to work, do not want us to think, do not want us to imagine outside of its bounds. ...more

The Miracle Bowl

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Praise the family that tethers me. Praise the well-used kitchen utensils and scoured mixing bowls and butter knives, thick slabs of jelly on the bread. ...more

Blue, Blue Windows: On Writing and Helplessness in the Age of Trump

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The brain in the jar wants out, you know. It just can’t do anything about it. ...more

The Story We Have Yet to Tell: Talking with Haroon Moghul

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Haroon Moghul discusses How to Be a Muslim: An American Story, his own religious journey, and the blessings that come with being an outsider. ...more

The Rumpus Mini Interview #106: Louise Marburg

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The stories [in THE TRUTH ABOUT ME], like Marburg herself, are insightful, witty, to the point, and told with her wonderfully dry sense of humor. ...more

Reclaiming the Identity of the Witch: A Conversation with Katy Horan

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Katy Horan discusses Literary Witches, which she illustrated and worked on in collaboration with writer Taisia Kitaiskaia, out tomorrow from Seal Press. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #104: sam sax

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I could write a bullet list of sam’s sax’s recent accomplishments, but the wiser thing would be to advise you to pick up his newly released book MADNESS. ...more

Erasing the Girl: Why Don’t We Trust Women to Tell Their Stories of Disordered Eating?

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I didn’t want to criticize her, or demand explanations from her. I just wanted to hear her speak. ...more

Voices on Addiction: The Honeybee

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She never stopped, a bee buzzing from flower to flower to flower, collecting all the sweetness she could. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #87: Kai Cheng Thom

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Rarely is birth silent for anyone involved. Silence, instead, is a learned phenomena. Unlearning silence can become its own birth, as it seems in Kai Cheng Thom’s debut poetry collection a place called No Homeland, opening with, “diaspora babies, we are born of pregnant pauses.” Pausing for readers to meet her at this natal location of identity and origin, Thom finds traces of her voice scattered across a map of a place she’s constantly retracing.

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Where You Put It on the Line: A Conversation with Mychal Denzel Smith

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Mychal Denzel Smith discusses his debut nonfiction book Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching, how the activist space has changed in recent years, and who he is writing for. ...more

The Day the FBI Tapped Our Phones

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I held an image in my mind of my daughter and me in a small rowboat and I’m rowing, rowing, rowing as hard as I can, away from this sinking ship. ...more

Written in Chalk: What It Means to Be Crazy

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As truth becomes more elusive, as fact blends with fiction, we ought to take notice of how we categorize people, as categorization seems to be married to suppression, to disenfranchisement. ...more

MIXED FEELINGS: The Emotional Labor of Listening to Men Complain

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In the first installment of "Mixed Feelings," a science-based advice column, Mandy Catron offers counsel on handling a partner's obsession with their ex. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #76: Chris Tusa

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Set in post-Katrina New Orleans, Chris Tusa’s second novel, In the City of Falling Stars (Livingston Press, September 2016), tells a tale of paranoia and intrigue. Maurice Delahoussaye witnesses dead birds falling from the sky, and becomes convinced the air is toxic.

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Annie Lennox - Nostalgia | Rumpus Music

My Life with Annie Lennox: Nostalgia

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I don’t use the term “lifelong hero” frivolously. There are a lot of people I respect and wish to emulate; Annie Lennox, however, is the only “lifelong hero” I’ll ever have. I need her. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Abeer Hoque

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Abeer Hoque talks about coming of age in the predominantly white suburbs of Pittsburgh, rewriting her memoir manuscript ten times, and looking for poetry in prose. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

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Esmé Weijun Wang discusses her first novel, The Border of Paradise, about a multi-generational new American family, creative expression through writing and photography, and interracial relationships. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Brit Bennett

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Brit Bennett discusses her debut novel The Mothers, investigating “what-if” moments, and navigating racism in white spaces. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Cole Lavalais

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Cole Lavalais discusses her debut novel, Summer of the Cicadas, why she’s a huge fan of outlining, and the importance of dedicated communities for black writers. ...more

Self-Love Stew

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In her essay at Hazlitt, “Watch Me Bathe,” Jess Carroll shares that she barely bathes, and tells us that it’s for the better—in fact, it’s like reverse self-love and self-care, as we’ve come to think of those terms now. She rejects the idea that mental health is balanced on a teetering tower of meticulous hygiene routines, and that the only way to stay sane is to wash, rinse, and repeat as if unconcerned with anything else.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: A Brief History of a Bad Heart

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She studies you, still panting with an energy that consumes the room, and whispers in a reedy voice: “They say you fucked up your heart.” ...more