Posts Tagged: mental illness

cinderella

What We Lost: Undoing the Fairy Tale Narrative of Adoption

By

The singular, unavoidable truth about adoption is that it requires the undoing of one family so that another one can come into being. ...more

esme-bluedress-1300x300

The Rumpus Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

By

Esmé Weijun Wang discusses her first novel, The Border of Paradise, about a multi-generational new American family, creative expression through writing and photography, and interracial relationships. ...more

benntt300x300

The Rumpus Interview with Brit Bennett

By

Brit Bennett discusses her debut novel The Mothers, investigating “what-if” moments, and navigating racism in white spaces. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

What would you give to be happy, fun, anxiety-free? Would you give your soul? This is the question Deirdre Coyle asks in her story “Fun Person,” up at Hobart this week. The story opens with the narrator vomiting on the sidewalk outside of a bar, but not for the obvious reasons one might vomit in such a location.

...more

Bittersweet Symphony

By

Though it’s clichéd and maladaptive to cast mental illness as the wellspring of great writing, to write about one’s life honestly often means writing about one’s mental illness. In an essay for Catapult, Colin Dickey writes lushly about his experiences with depression, musing on the historical conceptions of melancholy and how perhaps our highly clinical and problematized category of depression could afford to be complicated by it:

What I called my depression is the feeling one gets as the world shades away, as though a silent wall of water is holding everything else at a remove.

...more

JDiazSelfPortrait-(1)300x300

Visible: Women Writers of Color #4: Jaquira Díaz

By

Jaquira Díaz discusses the challenge of writing about family members, her greatest joy as a writer, and her literary role models. ...more

Treatment and Healing

By

Treatment sometimes looks like hospitalization in an overcrowded psych ward and medication that can dissolve personality.

Over at American Short Fiction, Jenna Kahn writes about the depiction of mental illness in literature—as found particularly in “The Depressed Person” by David Foster Wallace, “Silver Water” by Amy Bloom, and “Monument” by Kevin Barry—as it matches (or doesn’t) with her own experience.

...more

the-old-windmill

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Heirlooms

By

The strings of our DNA mark us as one, but it’s the roots of our memories that bind us. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Rion Amilcar Scott’s debut collection Insurrections—our July Rumpus Book Club pick—comes out from University Press of Kentucky on Tuesday and is a timely and vital look into the daily struggles of individuals in the mostly black community of Cross River, Maryland, a fictional town that was founded by slaves in 1807 after a successful revolt.

...more

Goodnight Beautiful Women feature

This Week in Short Fiction: Goodnight, Beautiful Women by Anna Noyes

By

[Noyes's] stories are nuanced and unapologetic, revealing the shadow sides of women and girls in all their wild and terrible glory. ...more

Self-Love Stew

By

In her essay at Hazlitt, “Watch Me Bathe,” Jess Carroll shares that she barely bathes, and tells us that it’s for the better—in fact, it’s like reverse self-love and self-care, as we’ve come to think of those terms now. She rejects the idea that mental health is balanced on a teetering tower of meticulous hygiene routines, and that the only way to stay sane is to wash, rinse, and repeat as if unconcerned with anything else.

...more

Unlinking Mental Illness and Creativity

By

The idea that “mental illness is the heart of creativity” has persisted for decades. But this idea can negatively impact one’s ability to seek help that they truly need. At The Establishment, Sarah Bronson debunks the notion that treating mental illnesses like depression unilaterally has a negative impact on one’s ability to create:

I recognize that not all mental illnesses are alike and that some people actually appreciate how their illness uniquely empowers them.

...more

Lawson_photo_jacket_Maile Wilson

The Rumpus Interview with Jenny Lawson

By

Jenny Lawson talks about her second memoir, Furiously Happy, mental illness, and growing up in small-town Texas. ...more

12139950_10153603113537910_5263707483582015810_o

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Karrie Higgins

By

The more narratives that approach reality "differently" get treated as "insane" or "unreal," the less readers are exposed to them, and the more "unreal" or "insane" they seem. It's like a feedback loop. ...more

Screen-shot-2011-12-19-at-8.52.54-PM

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: On Madness and Mad Men

By

In my eight years as a Mad Men fan, the series has repeatedly prompted me to reflect on parenting. ...more

else feature

Thebes

By

The tragedy of a mentally ill mind or a richly realized fantasy is that its world exists only for its inventor. It is the loneliest party, the most isolating game. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Let’s talk about sentences. Let’s talk about how poets, when they let their lines run long to prose, can make sentences sing. And if we’re going to talk about those sentences, we must also talk about details. Details, details, and more details.

...more

Creativity and Mental Illness

By

Though I did not know it then, Adeline was not just a work of fiction, or an act of literary ventriloquism. It was my suicide note. Had I succeeded in taking my life, this would have been clear.

At Lit Hub, Norah Vincent writes about the intensity of creating her Virginia Woolf novel Adeline, the link between creativity and mental illness, and how this led her to attempt taking her own life.

...more