Posts Tagged: Mexico

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The Rumpus Interview with Phoebe Gloeckner

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Artist and author Phoebe Gloeckner talks about her semi-autobiographical novel The Diary of a Teenage Girl, just adapted into a film starring Kristen Wiig and Alexander Skarsgard, and what she's working on now. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Review: Güeros

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It’s a literal confrontation of his metaphorical fear, a visual take on Rilke’s words: to view Güeros is to see a “thing poem” on the screen, to witness something like “The Panther” materialize. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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On Monday, the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction was awarded to Jack Livings for The Dog, a collection set in China in the last decades of the 20th century. What makes Livings’s stories remarkable isn’t just the tight prose and impressive research (he told the Wall Street Journal that he spent a year and a half reading oral histories from glassblowers and researching Mao Zedong’s embalming process for just one story), it’s that he managed to write about a foreign culture with nuance and depth and not mess it up.

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Infierno Completo

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Sergio Pitol gets the profile treatment over at Lit Hub:

Sergio Pitol (1933) is all of the above; he is, I believe, a total writer. And by writer I do not mean one of those intellectuals who flirt with power (“The difference between who I am now and who I was then is defined by my passion for reading and my aversion for any manifestation of power,” he declares in The Art of Flight), nor a multipurpose lecturer: in Mexico we tend to laud with the uppercase W of “Writer” anyone who, in addition to publishing occasionally, anoints candidates in popular election.

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The Rumpus Interview with Antonio Ruiz-Camacho

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Author Antonio Ruiz-Camacho speaks about his new collection, Barefoot Dogs, breakthrough stories, the writing process, and why translating his book for readers in Mexico feels like a homecoming. ...more

Other Voices Querétaro Dates and Faculty Announced

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Now in its third year, Other Voices Querétaro, launched by longtime Sunday Rumpus editor Gina Frangello, and boasting a host of Rumpus regulars as faculty, including Emily Rapp, Rob Roberge, and the newly added Jennifer Pastiloff, announces its 2015 dates: May 15-25.

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“I Am One of Them”

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Crossing Over, a documentary by director Isabel Castro, follows three transgender women—all of them undocumented Mexican immigrants—as they seek asylum in the US.

“Although this started as a project to raise awareness about the complexities of immigration,” Castro told Buzzfeed, “it has grown into one that is trying to raise awareness about transphobia (both in Latin American cultures and in the United States.)”

For more details, including a beautiful trailer, check out the film’s website.

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Not Your Average Mexican Tourist Destination

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I can’t afford a $3,000 American tooth implant, but luckily, I’m spending this summer at my Somali aunt and uncle’s house in Yuma, Arizona—a town only ten miles away from Los Algodones, Mexico, where a new tooth costs $1,000.

If that doesn’t make you want to read the rest of Safy-Hallan Farah’s dental-tourism story, you might need your brain recalibrated.

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Anti-Nanotechnology Terrorism

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Nature investigates the rising number of terrorism attacks, and threats, against researchers in the field of nanotechnology. Those perpetrating the violence claim to be environmental activists, and believe that nanotechnology will result in further harm to our planet. They are not afraid to make their mission known:

“The next day, an eco-anarchist group calling itself Individuals Tending Towards Savagery (ITS) claimed responsibility for the bombing in a 5,500-word diatribe against nanotechnology that it published online.

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Drug Violence and the Lacking American Media Response

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The recent massacre at a casino in Monterrey, Mexico marks the pinnacle of drug war-related violence.

The response to this tragic episode by the American media reveal the frailties of our news coverage—this story was seriously lacking the attention it deserved across many of our media outlets, a silence that unfortunately dictates a scarcity of American tweets.

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Can Legalizing Drugs be a Solution for the Violence in Mexico?

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Some Mexican politicians and public officials–in addition to a significant portion of the Mexican public–believe that it is “time to go back to a policy of peaceful co-existence with the cartels”.

With the death toll perpetually on the rise (around 3,000 deaths in 2007 to almost 20,000 in 2010), people are starting to question whether the government’s violent frontal attack on drug cartels is really accomplishing anything.

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Love in the Time of Terror Babies

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“My parents, with admirable foresight, had their first child while they were on fellowships in the United States. My mother was in public health, and my father in a library-science program. Having an American baby was, my mother once said, like putting money in the bank.”

So begins Daniel Alarcón (who is reading at the next Monthly Rumpus)’s recently published short story “Second Lives,” whose narrator is a Latin American man with a potent longing for a First World life.

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“Narcocorrido’s”: Music About The Drug Cartels

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“In San Jose, Costa Rica, they took him prisoner, now the whole world knows how the ballad begins of Rafael Caro Quintero.”

These are the some lyrics to an older narcocorrido, a genre of ballad sung about the infamous Mexican drug cartels that have been growing in popularity since the 1970’s, according to an article over at NPR.

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