Posts Tagged: michael brown

There Is Simply No Time for This: Whose Streets? and Civil Rights Cinema

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It is unlikely I will see the US justice system evolve toward an egalitarian ideal in my lifetime. But Whose Streets? does offer a clearly visible North Star. ...more

On Grief and Inheritance: A Conversation with Brionne Janae

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The poet Brionne Janae discusses her debut poetry collection After Jubilee, intergenerational trauma, and writing her way into historical personae. ...more

Slang and Swagger: Riffing with Jeff Chang

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Jeff Chang discusses his latest book, We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, his work in hip-hip journalism, and the beauty and humanity of political protest. ...more

Binary States of America: A Letter to Obama

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In the end, although I wanted you to be more like Charles Bronson or Malcolm or Luke Cage, I am very proud to have witnessed your historic presidency—the successes, and even the disappointments. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Emily Raboteau

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Emily Raboteau discusses her essay, “Know Your Rights!” from the collection, The Fire This Time, what she loves about motherhood, and why it’s time for White America to get uncomfortable. ...more

Boyz n the Hood, Chi-Raq, and America 2016

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And while the faces and nomenclature between these historically discrete agents of change differ, the one governing commonality remains the same: unfettered gun ownership and correlative violence play a pivotal role. ...more

Southern Girl: Beyoncé, Badu, and Southern Black Womanhood

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None of the imagery of Lemonade is foreign to those of us who grew up in the South or who have Southern roots. ...more
Beyonce - Lemonade | Rumpus music

The Recipe to Decolonized Love is in Beyoncé’s Lemonade

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“There is a curse that will be broken,” she promises. ...more

He Doth Protest Too Much

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I’ve begun to question my place in society, my place in a country that wants me to remain silent. Mostly, I question my choice to remain silent. ...more

J. Cole and Ryan Coogler on Racial Inequality

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During an event hosted by Blackout for Human Rights at Harlem’s Riverside Church for #MLKNOW, J. Cole and director Ryan Coogler discussed racial inequality, police brutality, and the importance of allowing themselves to confront events such as the violence perpetrated on Michael Brown and Oscar Grant through their art.

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The Rumpus Interview with Margo Jefferson

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Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Margo Jefferson talks about her new memoir, Negroland, and about growing up in an elite black community in the segregated Chicago of the 1950s and 1960s. ...more

I’ll Fly Away: Notes on Economy Class Citizenship

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I want to break from a continued and systematic white supremacy so pervasive it is entrenched in the vernacular I use to express myself. ...more

Claudia Rankine and #BlackLivesMatter

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The American imagination has never been able to fully recover from its white-supremacist beginnings. Consequently, our laws and attitudes have been straining against the devaluation of the black body. Despite good intentions, the associations of blackness with inarticulate, bestial criminality persist beneath the appearance of white civility.

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The Rumpus Interview with Daniel José Older

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Author Daniel José Older talks about his new novel, Shadowshaper, noir influence in urban fantasy, gentrification, white privilege and the publishing industry, and why we need diverse books, now more than ever. ...more

Return to Braggsville

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Two authors take a trip that they did not take to a place that's no place (but could be anywhere) in Wiley Cash's feature on novelist T. Geronimo Johnson and his new book, Welcome to Braggsville. ...more

Outrage Laced With Vulnerability

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When the grand juries failed to indict Darren Wilson or Daniel Pantaleo, they added to a lineage of injustices enacted against black people in America. Rumpus contributor Kaveh Akbar speaks to Claudia Rankine about her poetry collection Citizen, which explores the microaggressions supporting the system that let it happen: 

I didn’t have a directive in the sense of raising consciousness.

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Science Fiction Can Show Us How

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In the wake of the events surrounding the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, science fiction can offer a particularly compelling alternative to illustrate a future without violence and inequality. Mary Hansen at Yes! talks with author and activist Walidah Imarisha, who coined the term “visionary fiction:”

I think that science fiction and visionary fiction, as my co-editor Adrienne Maree Brown says, are a perfect testing ground to explore the countless alternatives that could exist to policing and institutions like prisons.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, last week, men who have taken lives are walking away unpunished, unquestioned even. We have their victims’ names: Mike Brown. Eric Garner. We have their final words: Hands up, don’t shoot. (Six shots fired.) I can’t breathe.

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Eric Garner: A Rumpus Roundup

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In July, unarmed black man Eric Garner died after he was placed in a chokehold by a white police officer, Daniel Pantaleo, on Staten Island, a suburban borough of New York City.

This might sound eerily similar to the case of Michael Brown.

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Ferguson: A Rumpus Roundup

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Early in August, unarmed black teenager Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer, Darren Wilson, in Ferguson Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis.

While protests broke out in the weeks following Brown’s death, Wilson remained free, awaiting a grand jury indictment.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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The news of Michael Brown’s death cannot be ignored. When one of our young people dies from shots fired by a police officer, there will be sadness and confusion. There will inevitably be questions, and questions left unanswered will lead to anger. 

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