Posts Tagged: Michael Chabon

Notable Portland: 12/1–12/7

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Thursday 12/1: Senator Bernie Sanders comes to Portland to share his personal experiences from the campaign trail and read from his book, Our Revolution. Powell’s City of Books, 12 p.m., free.

Local author and Olympian Carolyn Wood reads from her memoir, Tough Girl.

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Notable Twin Cities: 11/27–12/3

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Monday 11/28: Head out to Common Good Books to hear two featured poets read their newest work. Emilie Buchwald will read from The Moment’s Only Moment, and Margaret Hasse will read from Between Us. 7 p.m., free.

Tuesday 11/29: At Barnes & Noble in St.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton

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Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton on their new book Knives & Ink, cooking with pigs' heads, and long-distance collaboration. ...more

Notable NYC: 11/19–11/25

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Saturday 11/19: We Are All Affected, a Trump Protest. Union Square, 11 a.m.–3 p.m., free.

Maxe Crandall, Allison Parrish, Charlie Bondhus, and Hal Schrieve celebrate the third issue of Vetch. McNally Jackson Books, 7 p.m., free.

Sasha Banks and Alex Cuff join the Segue Series.

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The Rumpus Interview with Emily Barton

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Emily Barton discusses dieselpunk, genderqueer magic, and the collaboration between reader and writer in her latest novel, The Book of Esther. ...more

The Amazing Fashion Week Adventures of Michael Chabon and Son

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For GQ, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon applies his discerning eye to a subject close to his heart: his fashion-obsessed son:

He would lay out its components, making a kind of flat self-portrait on the bedroom floor—oxford shirt tucked inside of cotton sport coat, extra-slim pants (with the adjustable elastic straps inside the waistband stretched to button at the very last hole), argyle socks, the whole thing topped by the ubiquitous hat—and I would try to understand what the kid got out of dressing up every day like a pint-size Ronald Colman out for a tramp across the countryside of Ruritania.

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Literary Cage Match

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At The Millions, Jonathan Gottschall compares his experience learning to cage fight with the struggles of being a writer, as “the writing game, like the fighting game, mostly ends in breakage”:

Literary history is a history of victors. So stories about the struggles of well-known writers almost always follow the comforting arc of suffering redeemed.

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The Last Book I Loved: Abbott Awaits

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Summer works like this. Every day small moments cycle like waves within tides, eroding our opportunities on a geological scale invisible from our point of immersion. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Benjamin Parzybok

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Author Benjamin Parzybok talks about his new novel, Sherwood Nation, climate fiction, the difference between post-collapse and post-apocalyptic, and how novels can predict the future if they try hard enough (and get lucky). ...more

Michael Chabon’s Punk Rock Days

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[The] Bats were a fine little band, a unique assemblage of diverse strengths and quirks, anchored by one of the most rock-solid drummers ever to grace the Pittsburgh scene, and hampered only by the weakness of their goofball frontman.

That’s a quote from Michael Chabon, novelist, screenwriter, and “goofball frontman” of 80’s Pittsburgh punk band, the Bats.

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Pynchon’s Paranoiac Vision

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In 1966, when The Crying of Lot 49 was published, Pynchon’s “all-ecompassing paranoiac vision of history” seemed “so kooky” and “far-fetched.”

Fast forward to 2013, and Pynchon’s Bleeding Edge, a novel focused on events before, during, and after 9/11 “becomes not just an ideal but a compulsory subject for a late Pynchon novel,” as Michael Chabon writes in his review for The New York Review of Books.

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Reaching Across the Bay Bridge

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In a sort of Bay Area meeting of minds, Scott Hutchins, author of a novel about San Francisco and Silicon Valley, profiles Michael Chabon, whose latest novel takes place mainly in Oakland and Berkeley.

Read it to learn about Chabon’s love for the East Bay, his similarities to Charles Dickens, and Telegraph Avenue‘s beginnings as a failed TV pilot.

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Summer Picks From Michael Chabon, Susan Orlean, Jennifer Egan, and More

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A new article over at Mother Jones gives us summer nonfiction picks from some of the biggest writers working today. Susan Orlean recommends The Looming Tower, Jennifer Egan selects The Image, and Michael Chabon has this to say about The Encyclopedia of Fantasy:

“A single, immense, thrilling work of literary theory disguised as a reference book.”

Hmm… Doesn’t sound exactly like beach material to us.

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The Rumpus Long Interview with Jonathan Lethem

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“I don’t go down wrong paths, I’d rather stare at the screen and delete until I’ve put something down that is working. So, I don’t discard material; I don’t have a lot of false starts or unfinished stories or novels lying around.

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Is Michael Chabon Giving Grownups Too Much Credit?

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In a recent article in the New York Review of Books, Michael Chabon laments the loss of a sense of adventure in childhood. “If children are not permitted—not taught—to be adventurers and explorers as children,” he said, “What will become of the world of adventure, of stories, of literature itself?”

But Sergei Lobanov-Rostovsky at The Kenyon Review thinks Chabon might be giving the grown-ups a little too much credit:

“Chabon … may be right that all children are instinctively adventurers, and he’s certainly right that limiting their exploration of the world in the name of safety threatens their creative imagination. 

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