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Posts Tagged: Michael Chabon

Pynchon’s Paranoiac Vision

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In 1966, when The Crying of Lot 49 was published, Pynchon’s “all-ecompassing paranoiac vision of history” seemed “so kooky” and “far-fetched.”

Fast forward to 2013, and Pynchon’s Bleeding Edge, a novel focused on events before, during, and after 9/11 “becomes not just an ideal but a compulsory subject for a late Pynchon novel,” as Michael Chabon writes in his review for The New York Review of Books.

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Reaching Across the Bay Bridge

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In a sort of Bay Area meeting of minds, Scott Hutchins, author of a novel about San Francisco and Silicon Valley, profiles Michael Chabon, whose latest novel takes place mainly in Oakland and Berkeley.

Read it to learn about Chabon’s love for the East Bay, his similarities to Charles Dickens, and Telegraph Avenue‘s beginnings as a failed TV pilot.

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Summer Picks From Michael Chabon, Susan Orlean, Jennifer Egan, and More

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A new article over at Mother Jones gives us summer nonfiction picks from some of the biggest writers working today. Susan Orlean recommends The Looming Tower, Jennifer Egan selects The Image, and Michael Chabon has this to say about The Encyclopedia of Fantasy:

“A single, immense, thrilling work of literary theory disguised as a reference book.”

Hmm… Doesn’t sound exactly like beach material to us.

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The Rumpus Long Interview with Jonathan Lethem

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“I don’t go down wrong paths, I’d rather stare at the screen and delete until I’ve put something down that is working. So, I don’t discard material; I don’t have a lot of false starts or unfinished stories or novels lying around.

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Is Michael Chabon Giving Grownups Too Much Credit?

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In a recent article in the New York Review of Books, Michael Chabon laments the loss of a sense of adventure in childhood. ”If children are not permitted—not taught—to be adventurers and explorers as children,” he said, “What will become of the world of adventure, of stories, of literature itself?”

But Sergei Lobanov-Rostovsky at The Kenyon Review thinks Chabon might be giving the grown-ups a little too much credit:

“Chabon … may be right that all children are instinctively adventurers, and he’s certainly right that limiting their exploration of the world in the name of safety threatens their creative imagination.  But let’s be clear: the maps we draw for our children are not the maps that guide their lives.  They draw their own maps, but it’s a mistake to confuse them with the nostalgic – or anguished — images produced by adult memory.  Childhood is a foreign country to us.  We once knew its landmarks, but they’ve grown wild in our imaginations, so that the “adventures” we remember are now just stories we tell.  Adventure is what we call it when we show the slides.  The natives just call it life.”

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