Posts Tagged: n+1

This Week in Essays

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Alexandra Wuest tackles grief, art, and the insights solitude can offer over at Fanzine. For Real Life, Eleanor Penny asks the big questions about and considers the implications of the creation of an artificial womb. Here at The Rumpus, Zoe Fisher recalls finding a radical sanctuary in her local library as a teenager.

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Deplorable Men Need Love Too

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She went on to become a Siberian housewife. He went on to call for the executions of ten million Russians. But she thought back on their evenings drinking and dancing. He sang songs to her in his sweet, high voice. Behind every dictator is a woman who sees something redeemable in him. For n+1, Shawn Wen […]

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The Generosity of Anonymity

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At n+1, Dayna Tortorici defends Elena Ferrante’s anonymity against yet another round of exposure, calling the unmaskers out for insensitivity and greed. Tortorici believes it’s all too easy to be distracted from the integrity of the book by the author’s bio and personality. She writes, “Ferrante’s absence keeps things open: ‘Remove that individual [the author] […]

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“A Return to the Pleasures of Critical Discourse”

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“Greif turns the quotidian world over like a miniature globe in his hand, scrutinizing it for false messages, bad faith, and the occasional sign of progress,” writes Daphne Merkin, in The New York Times, of n+1 co-founder Mark Greif’s essay collection, Against Everything. On subjects as diverse Thoreau, exercise, “foodieism,” and the Octomom, Greif’s eye is […]

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“A Hologram of Self”

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Kristin Dombek’s The Selfishness of Others: An Essay on the Fear of Narcissism is just out from FSG, and over at n+1 she writes beguilingly, with humor and aplomb, about narcissists as hollow selves who become genius-tricksters at copying and adopting the brightest parts of the selves of others. Beware! They take what they think […]

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The Things Abandoned by Hollywood

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Thinking about his films while watching an American film leads to a sobering realization: all the things that Kiarostami could not show in his films became the only things Hollywood filmmakers chose to show in theirs. What he showed in his films were the things abandoned by Hollywood: conversation, friendship, understanding, compassion, and empathy. There’s […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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In a darkly humorous new story at n+1, Jen George questions the qualifications of being “adult,” gives thirty-somethings across the world nightmares, and packs in plenty of social criticism while she’s at it. The story, “Guidance/The Party,” follows a single, childless, career-less, 33-year-old woman who is visited by a mysterious Guide. The Guide has been […]

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Remembering Jenny Diski

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At n+1, philosopher and writer Justin E.H. Smith remembers Jenny Diski, and shares their correspondence. For Diski, death was always the subject, the knot to admire, wryly, and attempt to untie: …the year before her diagnosis, Jenny invokes the bleak wisdom of Beckett’s line, “Birth was the death of him.” She wonders with Nabokov why […]

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Conversations with Writers Braver than Me: Anne Roiphe

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Anne Roiphe on respecting writers’ freedom to express the truth of their experiences, while also respecting their subjects’ prerogative to shun them for it.

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All Are Bad

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We’ve all read at least one: from “Against YA” to “Against Happiness,” essays that promise to dismiss entire abstract concepts using only rhetoric make for great click-bait. In The New Yorker, Ivan Kreilkamp explains why we keep overstating the case: “Against [X]” is a symptom of a liberal culture’s longing to escape its own strictures; […]

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Notable NYC: 8/23–8/29

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Saturday 8/23: Junot Diaz signs books. La Casa Azul Bookstore, 3 p.m., free. Monday 8/25: Vanessa Manko launches The Invention of Exile with Salman Rushdie, and sponsored by HIP Lit. Manko’s debut novel follows a Russian inventor’s immigration to Connecticut in 1913. Powerhouse, 7 p.m., free. Tuesday 8/26: Justin Taylor and Jess Row read from […]

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The Rise of a New Socialist Literary Scene

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Facing financial inequality and burdened with debt, millennials have discovered Marxism, writes Timothy Shenk for the Nation. And millennial writers are leveraging technology, rejecting old guard institutions, and constructing new forums for discussion: Combine all this with some fondness for navel gazing and with the fortunes of geography—politics aside, New York writers are New York […]

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The Incidental Bookseller

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In n+1‘s continuing examination of Amazon, Ruth Curry, co-founder of online bookstore Emily Books, looks at the relationship of the online megastore to publishers. Amazon’s entry into the publishing world was an accident: Amazon was only incidentally a bookseller: Bezos liked books because online shoppers didn’t have to try them on or smell or measure […]

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Alexander Chee on MFA Programs

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Take a break from wracking your brain about whether or not to get an MFA and go read Rumpus Pal Alexander Chee’s essay “What Getting an MFA In Fiction Meant To Me” at BuzzFeed. Chee beautifully narrates the inner debate he had with himself for many years over the decision to pursue an MFA. It’s […]

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Notable NYC: 2/22–2/28

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Saturday 2/22: Diane Josefowicz, Justin Boening, Marina Kaganova, and Bianca Stone celebrate the release of the Spring issue of The Saint Ann’s Review. KGB, 7 p.m., free. Chris Chosea will write custom poems. Third Factory, Old American Can Factory, noon, free. Sunday 2/23: Clifford Chase and Rick Whitaker join the Sunday Night fiction series, although […]

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Notable NYC: 1/4–1/10

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Saturday 1/4: Rosebud Ben-oni, Leopoldine Core, Kathy Ossip, Derek Pollard, and Bianca Stone join the quarterly reading series Couplet. Leah Umansky hosts. The Delancy, 7 p.m., free. n+1 celebrates the launch of Issue Eighteen: Good News. Recess Activities, 8 p.m., $10 or free for subscribers. Sunday 1/5: Veronica Gonzalez Peña and Victoria Patterson join the […]

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Home Sweet Omaha

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Nebraska: golden Midwestern land of corn, cows, and…call centers? Kathleen Massara writes for n+1 about growing up in Omaha. Massara’s Nebraska has a lot more frustrating cubicle jobs than, say, Willa Cather’s, but then again, maybe they aren’t so different after all:

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Torture

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n+1 shares Marco Roth’s “On Torture and Parenting,” an essay originally published in 2006, in light of the release of Roth’s recent memoir, The Scientists: A Family Romance. Roth, one of the founding editors of n+1, explores the parallels between parenting and torture, eventually leading to an exploration of the torture perpetrated by the then-current Bush Administration. At […]

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Russian Punk Band Pussy Riot Sentenced to Two Years for ‘Hooliganism’

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Today in a Russian court, three members (Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22, Maria Alekhina, 24, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, 30)  of the all-female Russian punk band Pussy Riot were sentenced to two years in prison for “hooliganism.” (For those unfamiliar with the story, here is a round-up of links that we published last week.) The trio had been facing up […]

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The Death (and Rebirth?) of the Book Review

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Why review books? At The Awl, Jane Hu takes a historical approach to answering that question. Quoting writers from Alexander Pope to Jonathan Franzen, Hu argues that the apparently ever-progressing “death” of the book review is perhaps a more nuanced process than it first appears: “Perhaps a large problem in the decline of good criticism […]

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“Stray Dogs”

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At n+1, Rafael Gumucio writes from within the Chilean student protests, recalling the rebellions of his generation–which grew up under the military regime–as he details the “hunger for equality” that characterizes current movements in Chile and beyond. “Over the six long months of school sit-ins, marches, unavailing efforts at dialogue, barricades, and gunshots, everything shifted […]

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What Is Already Living: Author, Autobiography and Fiction in the Age of Social Networking

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WRITE YOUR STORY reads the advertising placard for corporate octopus Citibank on display in the Union Square subway station in Manhattan. The campaign’s thrust appears to be this: by spending money, being a consumer, one, in fact, indites a story on the face of the everyday.

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Chatting Through the Ages

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This n+1 piece tracks the history of conversation, in different mediums. The vastly diverging worlds of talking vs. conversation vs. chatting online have all experienced their own evolution. Even just focusing on chat itself reveals a trajectory perpetually informed by the ways in which we chat online. From AOL chat rooms to Gmail, factors like […]

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