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Posts Tagged: n+1

The Incidental Bookseller

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In n+1‘s continuing examination of Amazon, Ruth Curry, co-founder of online bookstore Emily Books, looks at the relationship of the online megastore to publishers. Amazon’s entry into the publishing world was an accident:

Amazon was only incidentally a bookseller: Bezos liked books because online shoppers didn’t have to try them on or smell or measure them.

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Notable NYC: 1/4–1/10

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Saturday 1/4: Rosebud Ben-oni, Leopoldine Core, Kathy Ossip, Derek Pollard, and Bianca Stone join the quarterly reading series Couplet. Leah Umansky hosts. The Delancy, 7 p.m., free.

n+1 celebrates the launch of Issue Eighteen: Good News. Recess Activities, 8 p.m., $10 or free for subscribers.

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Elif Batuman Makes “Allopatric Speciation” Interesting

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You’d think an essay about Franco Moretti, morphology, and the diminution of classic novels to “five tiny dots in the graph of Figure 2″ would be academic and sawdust-dry.

Not in the hands of Elif Batuman, who brings her wry humor and quiet appreciation of human absurdity to just such an essay in n + 1 without sacrificing any of the necessary intellectual rigor.

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Torture

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n+1 shares Marco Roth’s “On Torture and Parenting,” an essay originally published in 2006, in light of the release of Roth’s recent memoir, The Scientists: A Family Romance.

Roth, one of the founding editors of n+1, explores the parallels between parenting and torture, eventually leading to an exploration of the torture perpetrated by the then-current Bush Administration.

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Russian Punk Band Pussy Riot Sentenced to Two Years for ‘Hooliganism’

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Today in a Russian court, three members (Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22, Maria Alekhina, 24, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, 30)  of the all-female Russian punk band Pussy Riot were sentenced to two years in prison for “hooliganism.”

(For those unfamiliar with the story, here is a round-up of links that we published last week.)

The trio had been facing up to seven years, but, after much deliberation, was sentenced to two years in prison for an anti-Putin song they performed in a church.

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The Death (and Rebirth?) of the Book Review

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Why review books? At The Awl, Jane Hu takes a historical approach to answering that question.

Quoting writers from Alexander Pope to Jonathan Franzen, Hu argues that the apparently ever-progressing “death” of the book review is perhaps a more nuanced process than it first appears:

“Perhaps a large problem in the decline of good criticism is that readers no longer know how, or where, to find critics, and, more importantly, how to define what makes it Good.”

Hu’s essay is in some aspects a continuation of the narrative established in Elizabeth Gumport’s 2011 essay “Against Reviews” for N+1, an impassioned argument for a complete rethinking of the form and its uses.

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“Stray Dogs”

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At n+1, Rafael Gumucio writes from within the Chilean student protests, recalling the rebellions of his generation–which grew up under the military regime–as he details the “hunger for equality” that characterizes current movements in Chile and beyond.

“Over the six long months of school sit-ins, marches, unavailing efforts at dialogue, barricades, and gunshots, everything shifted and is still shifting, an unending moral earthquake in a country that seemed to have turned away from great moral questionings, the pain of the dictatorship, the urgency of reconciliation.”

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What Is Already Living: Author, Autobiography and Fiction in the Age of Social Networking

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WRITE YOUR STORY reads the advertising placard for corporate octopus Citibank on display in the Union Square subway station in Manhattan. The campaign’s thrust appears to be this: by spending money, being a consumer, one, in fact, indites a story on the face of the everyday.

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Who Do We Invite To The Orgy?

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Tom Lutz at the Los Angeles Review of Books discusses Elizabeth Gumport’s essay in n+1 called “Against Reviews.”

Lutz writes “Taste cultures do have something to do with circles of intimates, and the explosion of book clubs in recent years is testimony to a general desire for, if not an orgy, at least something more personal and embodied than a Sunday book supplement.

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Regarding John Ross’ Ashes: A Very Specific Request

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Let’s collectively remember John Ross, a “relentless political and literary experimenter” with revolutionary tendencies.

Best known for his book Murdered by Capitalism and his coverage of the Zapatistas movement in Mexico, where he spent a significant portion of his life, Ross wandered the globe from San Francisco to Peru to Iraq, documenting his insurrectionist journeys.  One of his last requests?  To have his family mix his ashes “with marijuana and have them rolled into a spliff to be smoked at his funeral.”

(via Arts & Letters Daily)

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n+1′s Non-Boring Panel on Healthcare

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Leave it to literary magazine n+1 to get interesting people together to talk about interesting things that are of interest right now. For example, in December they had Malcolm Gladwell and Christine Smallwood discussing Evangelicalism and the Contemporary Intellectual. A discussion on gentrification was held in January at the radical bookstore Bluestockings.

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Notable New York, This Week 12/7 – 12/13

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This week in New York Malcolm Gladwell and James Wood talk about Evangelicalism and the Contemporary Intellectual, members of the Velvet Underground reunite at the New York Public Library, 60 Writers/60 Places screens, Anne Carson performs, Andy Warhol films get shown at Anthology Film Archives, Mark Doty and Marie Howe read, and Voice 4 Vision Puppet Festival presents odes to Salvador Dalí and Fernando Pessoa.

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Notable New York, This Week 11/30 – 12/6

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This week in New York Cate Blanchett acts in A Streetcar Named Desire, John Ashbery and Paul Auster read, Mike Daisey monologizes, an n+1 panel discusses feminism and love, Sherman Alexie talks with Rick Moody, Samuel Beckett’s Letters get talked about, and Charles Burns and Adrian Tomine stand around, talk and sign books at The Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival.

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Notable New York, This Week 11/9 – 11/15

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This week in New York Ben Marcus and Rivka Galchen at Harper’s Magazine’s The Family Table, Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach talk, Mary Gaitskill, John Turturro, and Eric Bogosian at PEN benefit, Frederick Wiseman’s documentary La Danse, Jeff Lewis and the Wowz!

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Notable New York, This Week 10/19-10/25

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This week, Chinua Achebe speaks, n+1 in conversation with Reihan Salam and Ross Douthat, Jonathan Lethem reads, composer/drummer Bobby Previte with Psychedelic Furs’ Knox Chandler, photographer Jeff Wall presents more urban decay, “junkyard bohos” Huggabroomstik play, CMJ Music Marathon begins and Renée Fleming sings at the Met.

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Notable New York, This Week 10/5-10/11

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MONDAY, October 5, 2009 – SUNDAY October 11, 2009

This week in New York, Stephen Elliott reads from his memoir The Adderall Diaries, which has its East Coast Launch with n+1, Spike Jonze week in New York, Sufjan Stevens performs, Arthur Jones hosts The Post-It Note Reading Series, Opium Magazine hosts Live Relaunch, Todd Solondz’s Life During Wartime screens at the NYFF.

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Letting Go By Making Stories: Philip Connors Tackles Suicide

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In 1996, Phillip Connors’ brother unexpectedly committed suicide.  Now, over a decade later, Connors is getting closure through the completion of a 22,000 word account of his family’s experiences called “So Little to Remember”.

The piece, which tackles more than his family’s reactions to the suicide, began as a “thought experiment” put together by Connors to identify patterns in his brother’s life leading up to his unexpected death.  “So Little to Remember” also reminds us of the important differences between life and writing about life, as the author explains in his note to Maud Newton.  Ultimately, Connors feels his piece is independent from the events it is based on; a method of “letting go by making stories.”

“So Little to Remember” will be out in the latest issue of  n+1 magazine.  To tide you over, an excerpt is available  on Maud Newton’s blog.

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