Posts Tagged: Natasha Trethewey

What to Read When You Want to Feel Thankful

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Kick off the holiday season with a list of books that Rumpus editors are thankful for! ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 15): “Southern History”

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We can’t hide from our history and we can’t pass it on to future generations. ...more

What to Read When You Want to Make America Great Again

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Here is a list of books that help remind us what actually makes America great (hint: it's not tax cuts). ...more

On Grief and Inheritance: A Conversation with Brionne Janae

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The poet Brionne Janae discusses her debut poetry collection After Jubilee, intergenerational trauma, and writing her way into historical personae. ...more

Notable Chicago: 1/27–2/2

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Friday 1/27: Visit Women & Children First to celebrate the launch of Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing by Marie Hicks. 7:30 p.m., free.

Saturday 1/28: The fourth installment of the Chimera Reading Series is happening in Logan Square.

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Of Poetry and Protest and Monticello In Mind

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Barbara Berman reviews Of Poetry and Protest: From Emmitt Till to Trayvon Martin and Monticello In Mind: Fifty Contemporary Poems on Jefferson today in Rumpus Poetry. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Jonterri Gadson

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Jonterri Gadson about Blues Triumphant, her love of editing, and the intersection of poetry and comedy. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Phillip B. Williams

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Phillip B. Williams about his new book Thief in the Interior, form in poetry, and balancing editing work with one's own. ...more

The State of American Poetry

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If you liked David Biepsiel’s State of American Poetry address, here’s a nice counterpart by Natasha Trethewey at the Virginia Quarterly Review.

“Despair about the place of poetry in American culture is nothing new,” she begins, and goes on to write about the necessity and indelibility of poetry at the most basic levels:

For all of that, poetry is the corrective, the sacred language that allows us to connect across time and space, across all the things in everyday life that separate us and would destroy us.

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