Posts Tagged: National Book Award

A Deeply Human Act: Don’t Call Us Dead by Danez Smith

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What is so extraordinary about this collection is its lyricism, its humanity, and its urgency. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bonnie Jo Campbell

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Bonnie Jo Campbell discusses her collection Mothers, Tell Your Daughters, the natural world as a character, and finding writing from the male point of view easier. ...more

Touring Trump’s America on Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad

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Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad won the National Book Award on Wednesday night. In his acceptance speech he told us, “We’re happy in here; outside is the blasted hellhole wasteland of Trumpland. Be kind to everybody. Make art and fight the power.”

Not only was this apt for the evening, but it also describes the landscape of his novel, which presents us with several different Americas, including the diverse, literary America he was referring to.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #57: Jesse Ball

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It can be hard to describe a Jesse Ball novel. They’re willfully strange, dark and puzzling, but the pieces aren’t always designed to fit together. Instead, each of his books, which are always written in the first person, have a tendency to take the reader into the heads of the lead characters, which is often more treacherous than the physical landscape.

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War Narratives #6: The Rumpus Interview with Phil Klay

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When you’re writing fiction, you can follow your own ignorance. You can write something and realize how flawed you are. ...more

Why Some Voices Are “Stronger” than Others in YA Lit

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At the School Library Journal, Kelly Jensen examines gender norms and double standards in YA fiction, questioning which female protagonists we refer to as “strong”—and why do not refer to male voices as such:

When women take risks in their writing, when they choose to write female-driven narratives with take-no-bull girls who may not care at all whether you like them or not, they’re not seen as brave.

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The Rumpus Interview with Lauren Groff

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Lauren Groff talks about her new novel, Fates and Furies, the life of creative people and those who love them, and why she's grateful to anyone who reads books. ...more

Judging the Judges

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This year’s judges of the National Book Award seem to agree that women’s nonfiction writing is abundant and prize-worthy. The 2015 nonfiction longlist includes seven female-authored books, out of 10, the largest percentage of female nominees in the prize’s history. The longlist also contains two books by people of color, compared to last year’s one.

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The Rumpus Interview with Elliot Ackerman

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Elliot Ackerman discusses his debut novel Green on Blue, fighting with the Marine Corps in the Second Battle of Fallujah, and being labeled as a journalist . ...more

Jacqueline Woodson and the End of the World

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I think I was pretty nervous about it as a kid. I think I did [have] that fear of the world coming to an end. I think also it’s kind of how kids exist anyway, you know? You’re always fearing change; you’re always fearing the wrath of a parent; you’re always fearing that something is going to go wrong somewhere.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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This weekend, Heather Partington reviews Fridays at Enrico’s, Don Carpenter’s posthumous novel about novelists, and Inside Madeleine, a collection of stories by Paula Bomer that takes an unblinking look at femininity. While the former will strike a familiar chord for many Rumpus readers—Carpenter’s book follows a married couple pursuing literary success in the Beat world of 1960’s California—the latter is a “raw,” “sexual,” and “visceral” exploration of women in conflict with themselves and those around them.

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JHUMPA LAHIRI’S LOWLAND

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The final key moment was when, suddenly, I was able to write the novel without feeling as though I needed the crutch of all the research and all of the books, and I felt that the characters were strong enough and their motivations had become more or less solid for me and satisfying for me to just go deeper with them, knowing that this was part of who they were and part of their world.

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National Book Award Finalists Announced

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Here is the complete list of finalists for the National Book Award in the fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young adult categories.

The finalists include Rumpus interviewee Rachel Kushner and Rumpus book club participant George Saunders—plus one of the judges in the young adult category is our Letters for Kids editor Cecil Castellucci!

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William Vollmann: Respected Author and…Terrorism Suspect?

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William Vollmann is the author of dozens of novels, short stories, essays, and articles, and the recipient of a multitude of nominations, grants, and prizes, including the National Book Award.

He is also, according to a piece he wrote for the latest issue of Harper’s, the subject of a 785-page FBI file related to suspicions that he was the Unabomber or some other manner of terrorist.

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Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

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Congratulations to Keith Waldrop, winner of the National Book Award in Poetry. Here’s their interview with Waldrop.

Mark Scroggins uses the Barrett Watten reading I mentioned last week as a jumping off point for an interesting discussion of, as he puts it, “the relationship of personal formation, as detailed & explored in autobiography, and literary interpellation.”

The Valpariaso Poetry Review’s Poem of the Week is a selection from Rumpus contributor Alison Stine.

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Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

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Here’s some interesting reading from the world of poetry this week.

Michael Schaub at HTMLGIANT picks up where the Poetry Foundation left off a little while ago about martinis and poets. You’ll like their entries.

This is a little dated by internet standards, but it’s still worth looking at: Calvin Trillin versifies about the Roman Polanski apologists.

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