Posts Tagged: nautilus

This Week in Essays

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For Huffington Post’s Highline magazine, Jason Fagone profiles a trauma surgeon working to make a small dent in our country’s problem with gun violence. At Catapult, Abbey Fenbert writes a funny, heartfelt essay about trying to ban books in the seventh grade.

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This Week in Essays

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Minda Honey writes at Longreads on traveling to detox from whiteness and discovering there is nearly nowhere to escape. Good news, New Yorkers: apparently noise can be good for creativity. Susie Neilson looks at the good and the bad of noise pollution for Nautilus.

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Mindless Clickers

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Writing for Nautilus, Paul La Farge argues that it’s not the Internet’s fault we are mindless clickers: There’s no question that digital technology presents challenges to the reading brain, but, seen from a historical perspective, these look like differences of degree, rather than of kind. To the extent that digital reading represents something new, its […]

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Word of the Day: Cardialgia

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(n.); pain near or in the heart; suffering from or exhibiting overwhelming sorrow, grief or disappointment, particularly due to romantic love; heartburn “Deadly grief is not about stress alone, scientists say. It shines a light on the physiological bonds of love.” –Kirsten Weir, “Can You Die From a Broken Heart?” “You’ll be the death of […]

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Word of the Day: Dépaysé

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(adj.); out of one’s element; situated in unfamiliar surroundings; from the Old French despaisier (to exile) As a species, we’ve somehow survived large and small ice ages, genetic bottlenecks, plagues, world wars, and all manner of natural disasters, but I sometimes wonder if we’ll survive our own ingenuity. —Diane Ackerman, in “Nature, Pixellated” Camping, cottages, […]

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Word of the Day: Horometry

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(n.); the art, practice, or method of measuring time by hours and subordinate divisions; the art or science of measuring time; from the Greek hora (“time” or “season”) + metron (“measure”) With them who stood upon the brink of the great gulf which none can see beyond, Time, so soon to lose itself in vast […]

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Word of the Day: Nubivagant

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(adj.) wandering through or amongst the clouds; moving through air; from the Latin nubes (“cloud”) and vagant (“wandering”), c. 1656. I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and […]

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Word of the Day: Didapper

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(n.) commonly, a little grebe or dabchick, a small water bird that dives underwater; also, a name for someone who disappears for a time before bobbing up again His papers looked organized, from the outside, they weren’t messy, but there were tens of thousands of pages. And photographs? Thousands of them, scattered through which are […]

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