Posts Tagged: New Republic

This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your community, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of […]

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Life in the Historical Novel

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The historical novel describes then what might have happened within what happened; the feeling of being free within the machine of one’s fate, dare I even say the old consciousness. For The New Republic, Alexander Chee explores historical fiction and whether the genre owes more to literature or historical accuracy. For more from Chee on […]

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Nobler in Modern Language than the Mind

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Earlier this month, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival commissioned thirty-six playwrights to “translate” Shakespearean plays into modern English. Not everyone is happy about this. However, Sheila T. Cavanagh over at The New Republic argues there is nothing wrong with modernizing Shakespeare. While updated versions of Shakespeare traditionally focus on settings and costumes rather than language, it is no […]

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Searching for Something Better than the Best American

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David Lehman, series editor for Best American Poetry…dilates on Twitter, “the tyranny of technology,” and the downtrodden humanities…Glenn Stout, in Best American Sports Writing, describes ours as “metric-driven times,” in which we tend to “reduce everything to data—sales figures, ‘starred’ reviews, Facebook shares.” Heidi Pitlor, in Best American Short Stories, finds the number of writers […]

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This Filthy Stuff

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The New Republic has re-published a 1930 interview with a government censor, and it provides an interesting look into the mindset of the man charged with keeping “pollution” out of the hands of “innocent” New Englanders: Why, sometimes it’s the contact of innocence with this filthy stuff that sinks a boy into foul habits for […]

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Properly Blootered

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The New Republic has taken the task of dissecting our collective drunkenness; or at least the words we’ve used to describe it: There seems to be a universal trend to avoid stating the obvious. To describe someone as simply drunk, in drink, or in liquor is accurate but evidently uninspiring. One fruitful vein is to find terms that characterize […]

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Gratification Be Postponed

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Although it never garnered the intellectual prestige reserved for his contemporary Walter Benjamin’s critical zingers, Stefan Zweig’s work has recently enjoyed a revival at the hands of two publishers. Zweig’s legacy is that of a conflicted yet devoted proponent of liberalism, who struggled to understand the function of the humanities in World War II-era Vienna […]

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Latent Forgiveness

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At The New Republic, Eve Fairbanks offers an illuminating profile of Adriaan Vlok, a former apartheid leader turned evangelist: As we stopped at a series of dusty little nursery schools, I was struck by Vlok’s overall passivity. It contrasted sharply with the attitude of other white volunteers I’ve ridden with into poor black neighborhoods, who […]

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The Ex-Nazi Poet You’ve Never Heard Of

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Prussian poet Gottfried Benn landed on the wrong side of history, supporting Hitler’s government in the early 1930s when it promised solutions to the global economic collapse. But by 1934, his allegiance to the regime ended as it became clear the Nazi party were not “cultural pessimists” but rather “criminal politicians.” Over at The New […]

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The Perfect Sentence

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Stanley Fish knows how to appreciate a sentence. And as an avid supporter, he handpicks the historically significant, the revolution-inspiring and the dangerous sentences that have been crafted over the centuries in his book, How to Write a Sentence. This essay in the New Republic discusses what makes a great sentence and how to appreciate […]

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