Posts Tagged: New York Times Magazine

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Heather Havrilesky

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We are in a chaotic mess of a world, and our lives are going to be chaotic messes no matter how victorious and shiny we manage to become. ...more

The Person to Whom Things Happen

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The question of what posture to take toward our own pain is unexpectedly complicated. How do we understand our own suffering—with what words and to what ends?

For the New York Times Magazine, Parul Sehgal questions the terminology we use when talking about sexual assault: from “victim” to “survivor,” either term a kind of interpellation unto itself, possibly infringing on personhood—and all the facets “person” might mean.

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Building a Black Literary Movement

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The New York Times Magazine profiles editor Chris Jackson and how he’s building a literary movement for writers of color:

‘‘The great tradition of black art, generally,’’ he started again, ‘‘is the ability—unlike American art in general—to tell the truth. Because it was formed around the great American poison, the thing that poisoned American consciousness and behavior: racism.

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Queen of Hearts

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“Hello” is not really a compassionate breakup song, like Carole King and Toni Stern’s “It’s Too Late”—the breakup here seems to have happened long ago—but rather an acknowledgment that you can never really make a clean break, that the memories float around like emotional flotsam and sometimes still land ashore.

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A Fairy Tale, Reimagined

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There’s the crown-letted frog who can’t seem to truly love any of the women willing to kiss him, and break the spell. There’s the prince who’s spent years trying to determine the location of the comatose princess he’s meant to revive with a kiss, and has lately been less devoted to searching mountain and glen, more prone to bar-crawling, given to long stories about the girl who got away.

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Banksy and Sarcasm

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How wonderful it must feel to go to “Dismaland” and see through society! But how awful to see society embrace art that makes you feel nothing, that makes you think only about the vast chasm between you and everyone else.

In an essay in the New York Times Magazine, Dan Brooks writes about street artist Banksy, kitsch, and the zeitgeist of our times.

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The Rumpus Interview with Austin Bunn

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Austin Bunn talks about his new story collection, The Brink, his latest script for a short film, In the Hollow, working in multiple mediums, and why some novels read like early drafts of screenplays. ...more

Strolling Through New York

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Nathaniel Rich breaks down New York’s reputation, and literary history, as the greatest walking city for NYT Magazine:

Yet the idea of New York as a walker’s paradise—a city best, and only authentically, grasped by sauntering through it—has persisted. Much of the great literature of New York has been written from the perspective of the sidewalk: the deafening street clatter and humming rattle of the L train that roar through John Dos Passos’s “Manhattan Transfer”; Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man eating yams on a Harlem street corner and tasting freedom; the author Quinn in Paul Auster’s “City of Glass” realizing that the peregrinations taken around the city by his quarry spell out the words “Tower of Babel.”…You never need to ask New Yorkers where they’re going.

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The “Loser Edit”

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For the New York Times Magazine, Colson Whitehead traces the conception of the “loser edit,” and how it awaits us all. Fifteen years after the emergence of shows like Survivor and The Amazing Race, “the critical language used to carve up the phonies, saints and sad-sack wannabes of [these] reality shows has migrated, and the loser edit has become a limber metaphor for exploring our own real-world failures.”

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Temporary Residence

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At NYT Magazine, Maggie Jones profiles an entire generation: the South Korean adoptees making the trek back “home.” But having spent their lives abroad, where “home” is becomes a tough question to answer:

As Trenka writes in her memoir, “The Language of Blood”: “How can I weigh the loss of my language and culture against the freedom that America has to offer, the opportunity to have the same rights as a man?

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Patriarchy’s Slow Unwinding

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For the New York Times Magazine, A.O. Scott argues about the “slow unwinding” of patriarchy in American culture, drawing on modern television, history, and literature. In part responding to Ruth Graham’s essay at Slate, in which she urges against adults reading young adult fiction, Scott offers a different perspective:

Instead, notwithstanding a few outliers like Henry James and Edith Wharton, we have a literature of boys’ adventures and female sentimentality.

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Honest to a Fault

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You probably knew that Lena Dunham wrote a memoir (if you didn’t, she has), but she’d love to remind you why she’s qualified. Meghan Daum elaborates for the New York Times Magazine:

To suggest that Dunham is too young, too privileged, too entitled, too narcissistic, neurotic and provincial (in that rarefied Manhattan-raised way) to be dispensing advice to anyone is to add very little to the ever-expanding, very much already-in-progress conversation about her place in the culture and her overall right to exist.

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Murderer’s Murder Mystery Wins Prize

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When the judges of a lucrative “debut-detective-novel writing contest” chose Alaric Hunt’s murder mystery Cuts Through Bone, they didn’t realize it was written in prison by an actual murderer.

Click here to read a New York Times Magazine piece about Hunt’s crime, his novel, and what Minotaur Press decided to do with a criminal’s crime novel.

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