Quantcast

Posts Tagged: New York Times

Writing “the very stuff of life”

By

Today in unusual writing jobs: an inside look at what it’s like to be an obituary news writer for the New York Times.

Each day, it is our job to come to know such strangers intimately, inhaling their lives through telephone calls to their families, through newspaper and magazine profiles culled from electronic databases and through the crumbling yellowed clippings from the Times morgue that can fall to dust in our fingers as we read them.

...more

Like, Considering the Other Side

By

Critics might believe that “like” has infiltrated and degraded American English, but John McWhorter argues just the contrary. McWhorter claims that “like” is not a marker of the downfall of spoken language, but instead, a sign of its “growing sophistication.” He explains that “like” is not necessarily a sign of hesitation and indecision; it can be used to signify consideration.

...more

Fiction in the Digital Age

By

Serialized fiction is experiencing a resurgence, and we have technology to thank.

Back in 2012, The Silent History brought the serialized novel to our iPhones (check out our interview with co-author Kevin Moffett here). And now, there’s Wattpad. The New York Times takes an in-depth look the app, which sees “more than two million writers producing 100,000 pieces of material a day for 20 million readers on an intricate international social network.”

...more

It’s All Context

By

The Internet offers us near-limitless amounts of information, often for free, at the touch of our fingertips. But it’s also a tool, and like all tools, is subject to the ways in which it is (or isn’t) put to use. Rumpus interviewee Maria Konnikova considers how the lack of contextualization of Internet information shapes the way that information might be used, in writing and otherwise:

When we strip away context, we strip away everything that enables us to determine what something really means.

...more

The Alt Weekly is Dead, Long Live the Alt Weekly

By

How valuable are print alt weeklies? Very, Baltimore City Paper senior editor Baynard Woods argues in the New York Times.

Woods writes that alt weeklies are “connected to a city in the way that a website can never be” and that they “report on the cultural life of a city in a way that neither big daily papers nor websites can.”

But as costs rise and many independent papers are folded into corporate conglomerates (indeed, the City Paper was just purchased by the Baltimore Sun Media Group), is the era of alternative print journalism nearing its end?

...more

Do Likable Characters Equal Likable Stories?

By

I wonder if that is the case for many of us. Perhaps, in the widespread longing for likable characters, there is this: a desire, through fiction, for contact with what we’ve armored ourselves against in the rest of our lives, a desire to be reminded that it’s possible to open our eyes, to see, to recognize our solitude — and at the same time to not be entirely alone.

...more

“I Might Really Geek Out Here, Dude”

By

In 2005, Elizabeth Gilbert was a mid-list author with some fiction and some journalism under her belt. In 2006, she tried something new and published a memoir, Eat, Pray, Love. The rest is history and Oprah Book Club sales.

Now she’s returned to her roots with a novel, The Signature of All Things, and our very own Steve Almond talked with her about it for this surprisingly rollicking New York Times Magazine profile.

...more

Jonathan Safran Foer on the Sociopsychological Effects of Technology

By

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Jonathan Safran Foer (award-winning author of Everything is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close) contemplates the implications of living in a society full of “iDistractions,” arguing that the increased daily use of new technology might be limiting our capacity for empathy and compassion.

...more

Keep Doubt Alive with Essays

By

If you’re a regular Rumpus reader, you probably like essays. And if you like essays, you’ll probably enjoy this New York Times opinion piece about their literary and social value:

Ever since Michel de Montaigne, the founder of the modern essay, gave as a motto his befuddled “What do I know?” and put forth a vision of humanity as mentally wavering and inconstant, the essay has become a meadow inviting contradiction, paradox, irresolution, and self-doubt.

...more

What Footnote?

By

“The e-book hasn’t killed the book; instead, it’s killing the ‘page.’ Today’s e-readers scroll text continuously, eliminating the single preformed page, along with any text defined by being on its bottom.”

In this New York Times essay, Alexandra Horowitz discusses the footnote, speculating on its place in the future.

...more

British Hacking Scandal Roundup

By

Perhaps the most surprising thing about the British phone hacking scandal is the lack of coverage in the US press.

Among the US newspapers, the NY Times is the only one I can find which has done significant reporting on the story, though the best work on the story comes from (no surprise) the Guardian.

...more

Out Of Ugliness Comes Great Things

By

“I can’t help wondering if ugliness is not indispensable to philosophy. Sartre seems to be suggesting that thinking — serious, sustained questioning — arises out of, or perhaps with, a consciousness of one’s own ugliness.”

In a recent installment of the New York Time’s philosophy column The Stone, Andy Martin ponders the ugliness of Jean-Paul Sartre (and other philosophers) and Sartre’s tragic haircut that started it all.

...more