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Posts Tagged: new yorker

The Works Behind the Work

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Over at the New Yorker, Meg Wolitzer writes about the cultural influences that helped inform her novel The InterestingsThey include Archie comics, folk music, and Michael Apted’s “Up” films”:

A good chunk of what you need to know about the characters in the “Up” films is right there in their childhoods, and I suppose that’s true in many novels, too; and yet you often still need life to just continue to unspool like an old Bell and Howell projector gone amok in order to get the whole story.

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World Wide Poetry

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Poetry as we know it—sonnets or free verse on a printed page—feels akin to throwing pottery or weaving quilts, activities that continue in spite of their cultural marginality. But the Internet, with its swift proliferation of memes, is producing more extreme forms of modernism than modernism ever dreamed of.

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JHUMPA LAHIRI’S LOWLAND

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The final key moment was when, suddenly, I was able to write the novel without feeling as though I needed the crutch of all the research and all of the books, and I felt that the characters were strong enough and their motivations had become more or less solid for me and satisfying for me to just go deeper with them, knowing that this was part of who they were and part of their world.

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Great Novels with Bad Endings

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How many love affairs have you had with novels that ended abruptly, poorly, without cause or the “proper” resolution?

You finish the last word, your arms hang limp, the novel collapses into your lap, and you mutter: seriously?

In Joan Acocella’s New Yorker article “On Bad Endings,” Acocella explores some classic novels that left us feeling cheated, and why writing a “great” ending is so difficult and rare.

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Economists Set Phasers on Stun

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Nobel prize winning economist and NYT‘s columnist, Paul Krugman expresses his love for sci-fi and fantasy in an interview for Wired magazine.

Krugman cites Isaac Asimov’s novel Foundation as his inspiration for becoming an economist, a damned responsible one at that: “‘I read [Isaac Asimov's] Foundation back when I was in high school, when I was a teenager and thought about the psychohistorians, who save galactic civilization through their understanding of the laws of society, and I said ‘I want to be one of those guys.’ And economics was as close as I could get.’” 

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“Getting bin Laden”

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Nicholas Schmidle’s article in the New Yorker delves into the details of the night in Abottabad when Osama Bin Laden was killed.

The band of 23 Navy SEALs concealed within two Black Hawks, modified to fly undetected into Pakistani territory. This article reveals the leading up to and execution of the plan, a fascinating, detailed chronicle of events that links together the politics and planning that were in the works since 2008, when Obama was still a senator–definitely the best, thorough reporting on bin Laden’s death.

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Online Dating, Then and Now

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A recent New Yorker article brings you the history of online dating, in all of its splendor.

Nicholas Paumgarten traces back online dating to its roots at the World’s Fair in Queens in the fall of 1964, when it began with the romantic title, “Technical Automated Compatibility Testing.” Fast-forward to this anthropological assessment of contemporary twenty-year olds: “For many people in their twenties, Internet dating is no less natural a way to meet than the night-club-bathroom line.” Find out about all the stuff that happened in between!

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Notable New York, This Week 12/14 – 12/19

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This week in New York Rumpus Women take over!, New Yorker writer’s 20 Under 40 share their stories, Jonathan Ames and Justin Taylor are among writers who read from A Christmas Carol, J.D. Durkin pleads Stephen Colbert: Hire Me!, this month’s Soundtrack Series, and Tiny Furniture is this week’s Saturday Movie Pick.

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