Posts Tagged: Nick Hornby

Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living edited by Manjula Martin

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Today in Rumpus Books, Elizabeth Stark reviews Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living, edited by Manjula Martin. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Nina Stibbe

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Author Nina Stibbe discusses her new novel Paradise Lodge, our obsession with character likeability, and how she more than flirts with feminism. ...more

Rock & Home

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Can domestic life and rock & roll flourish together in contemporary novels? Should they? ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bud Smith

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Novelist Bud Smith talks about his new book, F-250, working construction and metalworking, finding writing after his friend’s death, and crashing his car over and over again. ...more

Hornby Keeps It Fresh

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For the Atlantic, Jennie Rothenberg Gritz interviews Nick Hornby about his new book Funny Girl and his experience adapting Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for the big screen. While Hornby says he would not consider writing a screenplay based on his own books, adapting other authors’ work has helped him to mix things up and “keep things fresh”:

A lot of what Funny Girl is about for me is the experience feeling very happy doing a certain thing with a certain group of people.

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Notable NYC: 1/31–2/6

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Saturday 1/31: The TEAM reads Five Plays by the TEAM. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free.

Monday 2/2: Paul Fischer discusses A Kim Jong-Il Production, a look at North Korea’s propaganda machine. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free.

Tuesday 2/3: Rebecca Scherm discusses her debut novel Unbecoming about an art heist with Helen Petersen.

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The Saturday Rumpus Review of Wild

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In simplicity there is truth, and being out in wide open spaces often has a way, like high-speed rail, to bring us back to simple things. ...more

Women Are More Interesting

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Nick Hornby often ends up fielding questions from fans eager to understand why he frequently writes about women, especially since he’s a man. Many of his novels feature female protagonists, and his second career as a screenwriter includes what he calls the “young girl trilogy.” It’s not a coincidence that women are the center of these stories, he explains to the Guardian:

“It seems to me quite often that the journeys of young women are more moving, because they are hemmed in more, and dramatically it’s more interesting to think about and write about people whose lives are circumscribed in some way.”

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Dear Sugar, You Are Now Being Played by Reese Witherspoon

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Here’s an informative little roundup of book news from the New Yorker‘s book-news blog.

Highlights include a 300-year-old cookbook, a “‘new type of fragmentation’ in contemporary literature,” and oh yeah—Reese Witherspoon is officially going to play our very own Cheryl Strayed in the movie adaptation of of her memoir Wild.

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