Posts Tagged: NPR

This Week in Short Fiction

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On Tuesday, Margaret Atwood released Stone Mattress, a collection of “wonderfully weird short stories.” Stone Mattress is Atwood’s eighth collection of stories, not to mention her 14 novels and other formidable volumes of poetry, children’s literature, and nonfiction.

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A Floating Library Comes to New York City

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NPR reports that floating library pop-up is coming to New York City in the Hudson River. The Floating Library is the work of artist Beatrice Glow and will feature books and chapbooks of underrepresented authors and poets as well as an outdoor reading room. The project will run from Saturday, September 6th through October 3rd and will be housed on an old steamship.

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Fine the Way You Are

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Homogeneity in the literary scene isn’t a recent development. Earlier this year, Junot Diaz caused a stir by branding the unbearable too-whiteness of his workshop experience. Justin Torres and Ayana Mathis couldn’t help but contribute:

“One of the characters is sort of referred to as having something like almond skin, something that would identify the character as black.

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Brown Bag Your American Literature, Quick

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Michael Gove, Britain’s Education Secretary, is rewriting Britain’s public school curriculum to be more British. To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, and The Crucible are among the titles being dropped from required reading lists.

“I put this in the context of what’s going on in Europe and the world at large, which is a growing nationalism, a growing suspicion of other people’s perspectives and ideas and values,” says Christopher Bigsby, professor of American Studies at the University of East Anglia and author of a biography of Miller.

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Tom Robbins Drives Down an Old Road

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NPR has an interview with author Tom Robbins about his new memoir, Tibetan Peach Pie: A True Account of an Imaginative Life. He gives some insight into his experience as a novelist-turned-memoirist, saying that writing a memoir is like driving down a once-familiar road,

…but there are potholes in it now, and some fast-food franchises sprung up along the way, and there’s occasionally a blind curve that you might not remember.

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Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

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When my father died my mother was still alive. And I think when your second parent dies, there is that shock: “Oh man, I’m an orphan.” There’s also this relief: It’s done; it’s finished; it’s over. Because I had felt for so many years that there was this sense of going through this whole passage, this whole last part of their lives, and all the emotional and practical difficulties of that.

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Nabokov vs. The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis

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“When Nabokov started translating [his English-language memoir] into Russian, he recalled a lot of things that he did not remember when he was writing it in English, and so in essence it became a somewhat different book,” Pavlenko says.

At NPR’s health blog, Shots, Alan Yu explores the controversial linguistic idea that the language(s) we speak helps shape how we perceive the world.

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Yumi Sakugawa on NPR Blog

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We’re absolutely thrilled to see NPR’s Code Switch blog highlight Rumpus cartoonist Yumi Sakugawa and her new book, I Think I Am in Friend-Love with You.

Here’s a small glimpse of her conversation with Code Switch’s Kat Chow, this bit on a recent comic she drew for the Rumpus:

…with “Moon Between The Mountains,” it honestly started as a random doodle of a kitty human being left on the door step of these strange, wrinkly-looking people.

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Are High School Students in Any Sort of Abstract Literary Danger?

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A recent piece on NPR indicated that, according to recent studies, high school students are more and more frequently reading below their grade level.

It explained that the growing popularity of book series like The Hunger Games among teenagers is an indirect cause of this, forcing classics that formerly dominated high school summer reading lists—”Sophocles, Shakespeare, Dickens, George Bernard Shaw, Emily Bronte and Edith Wharton”—out of academic consciousness.

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The Weird, Sad, Beautiful Lives of “Wayward Authors”

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Writers aren’t exactly known for taking the road more traveled by, and the authors profiled in Andrew Shaffer’s Literary Rogues are no exception.

There’s Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s proclivity for opium, Gustave Flaubert’s exhibitionism, and of course, Oscar Wilde’s love that dare not speak its name.

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