Posts Tagged: NPR

Annie Lennox - Nostalgia | Rumpus Music

My Life with Annie Lennox: Nostalgia

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I don’t use the term “lifelong hero” frivolously. There are a lot of people I respect and wish to emulate; Annie Lennox, however, is the only “lifelong hero” I’ll ever have. I need her. ...more

Writing Romance: The Rumpus Interview with Sonali Dev

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Sonali Dev talks about her latest novel, A Change of Heart, the romance genre, writing non-white characters, and the parallels between writing and architectural design. ...more

What to Read When the President Cuts Funding for Everything Good

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A list of books written by past NEA grant recipients, as well as books that inspire protest and remind us that we can make a different reality than the one we're in today. ...more

This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your community, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of the truth.

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Sound & Vision: Ken Freedman

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Allyson McCabe talks with Ken Freedman, the general manager of WFMU (the longest-running freeform radio station in the US), about the relevance of radio, technological innovation, and a just-launched morning show. ...more

Crybaby College Students and Their Bogus Trophies

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I’m a small blue dot living in a blood-red corner of a red state, so I’ve grown accustomed to hearing right wing talking points. I don’t like them, but they surface as regularly in my southwest Florida town as white egrets on the highway and dolphins in the Gulf.

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Trump Dads: A Confession

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Mine wears short shorts while he jogs, with a baseball cap over his baldness, and no shirt.

His comes home from work and changes into a full gray sweatsuit, then sits at the head of the kitchen table to relax by eating a block of cheddar cheese.

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Kids Read to Their Barbers for More Than a $2 Discount

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The Fuller Cut in Ypsilanti, Michigan is offering $2 discounts to kids who read a book to their barber during their haircuts. For NPR, Jennifer Guerra speaks with customers/readers and their parents, who not only are shaving a bit off their haircut budgets, but also have the extra opportunity to encourage reading and comprehension for their kids outside of school.

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Rosanne Cash - Black Cadillac | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: Rosanne Cash’s Black Cadillac

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In her voice, I am held, cradled even. I am equal parts longing and hope. I am home. ...more

Love Thyself

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For NPR, Annalisa Quinn reviews Eimear McBride’s new novel, The Lesser Bohemians. “For McBride’s characters … love encroaches into and alters the inner self,” Quinn writes. “The Lesser Bohemians is a love story, yes, but it is really an electric and beautiful account of how the walls of self shift and buckle and are rebuilt.”

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This Week in Short Fiction

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For a story in a different medium this week, check out Amber Sparks’s “Thirteen Ways to Destroy a Painting” from this year’s The Unfinished World—adapted to a radio play. It’s brought to your ears by NPR’s truly excellent storytelling podcast Snap Judgment and read by Thao Nguyen of the San Francisco-based folk-rock group Thao and The Get Down Stay Down.

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How to Survive as a Villain in Literature

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On NPR’s All Things Considered, Petra Mayer offers advice to those who she describes as the “unpunished” villains of literature (O’Brien from Orwell’s 1984, X-Men’s Magneto, Milton’s Satan): win over the audience with your cause and relatable personal faults, and you’ll not only survive to the last page but maybe also land a spot in the English canon.

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Sandra Cisneros on Her First Apartment

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Rachel Martin, host of the NPR series Next Chaptersits down with Sandra Cisneros, beloved author of The House on Mango Street, to reflect on Cisneros’s experience of moving into her first apartment. Cisneros speaks on the independence she found away from her “father’s roof,” and delivers brilliant wisdom on how to accept loneliness, how to own yourself, how to control your destino—by controlling your fertility and your money.

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Soldiers-Turned-Authors on War Literature

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For NPR Books, Quil Lawrence talks with a handful of soldiers-turned-authors about the genre of war literature that has been catalyzed by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. These authors want their audiences to know that war is not all Hollywood-scale battle scenes, and warn against the glamorization of war stories and hero-worshipping of veterans.

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Serial Fiction While You Wait for Next Week’s Episode

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NPR talks with the creators of Serial Box, a company self-described as the “HBO for readers.” Serial Box releases “episodes” you read over a 10-16 week season, in the hopes that readers will anticipate the next installment like they would the next episode of The Bachelorette, or binge-read a series after purchasing the complete box set.

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Podcatcher #3: Poetry Jawns

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Emma Sanders and Alina Pleskova charm us with their affection for each other, DIY ethos, and belief on Poetry Jawns, what matters is the work. ...more

YA Novels Help Parents Talk Sex

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A discussion with your kid about the birds and the bees might be one of the more intimidating moments of parenthood, but YA novelists can lend a hand. When YA writers confront modern issues of sex, rape, consent, abuse, and gender, they help parents—and schools—introduce these sensitive topics:

Consent doesn’t even have to be about sex, per se, says Earl Sewell, who has written several young adult novels, including one where a boy pressures a girl to send explicit photos after they start sexting.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Desiree Cooper

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Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told. ...more

Song of the Day: “Misunderstood”

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The incredible cacophony of the bridge on Wilco’s definitive ballad “Misunderstood” is all the more striking because of its contrast with the rest of the tender, harmonious song. The brilliance of songwriter Jeff Tweedy is on full display here as the speaker laments his own bad attitude with a self-deprecating tone.

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A Love Born of Mystery

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“I was looking at books… Gary and I had seen each other. We didn’t know one another. And he walked over to me in this particular bookstore and handed me a book by Teran and said, ‘You’ve gotta read this book, it’s really good.'”

NPR shares the love story of Gary Shulze and Pat Frovarp, retiring owners of Once Upon a Crime, a mystery bookstore in Minneapolis.

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An Urban Sort of Loneliness

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The Lonely City bristles with heart-piercing wisdom. Loneliness, according to Laing, feels “like being hungry when everyone around you is readying for a feast.” Later, she admits that at one point during her own hermetic existence in New York, “I felt like I was in danger of vanishing.” Thankfully The Lonely City goes far beyond a cry for connection in an overcrowded, overstimulated world.

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Crime Girls

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NPR explores whether and how putting “girl” in the title of your crime novel will garner favorable comparisons to heavy-hitters like Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and Paula Hawkins’s The Girl on the Trainand therefore benefit from an increase in sales:

So in a way, the girl insignia is trying to tie it into this larger marketing purpose, but sometimes it can be a disservice.

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Food Fit for a Pope

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He loves Argentinian empanadas and dulce de leche. In 2015, he said that if he had only one wish, it would be to travel unrecognized to a pizzeria and have a slice—or two or three. In other words, he may be protected by the world’s smallest army and be responsible for the spiritual governance of 1.2 billion people, but when it comes to eating, Pope Francis loves comfort food as much as the next person.

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