Posts Tagged: parenthood

Storytelling Is a Search: An Interview with Sequoia Nagamatsu

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Sequoia Nagamatsu discusses his debut collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, grief as a character, and the intersection of ancient myth and the modern world. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Savage Mind, Pt. 1

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The violence came in and we were not just in danger of being victims of it. We were in danger of being violent ourselves. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Khadijah Queen

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Khadijah Queen about her new collection I'm So Fine, the importance of including sexual assault as a part of everyday life, and how the poems in the collection found their form. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Joshua Mohr

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Joshua Mohr discusses his memoir Sirens, writing for his daughter, and why he values art that trusts its audience. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Emily Raboteau

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Emily Raboteau discusses her essay, “Know Your Rights!” from the collection, The Fire This Time, what she loves about motherhood, and why it’s time for White America to get uncomfortable. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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short-fiction

In a political climate in which undocumented immigrants are painted as criminals and rapists and half the country is crying for deportation, this week’s story reminds us that immigrants are fathers who love their daughters, who work hard and send money home to dying mothers, who will go to the ends of the Earth for their loved ones—they are normal Americans with normal hearts, just like the rest of us.

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What I’ll Tell My Children: On Being ‘F***Able’ under the Regime of President-elect

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It’s time to take responsibility for compliancy. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Motherhood is an all-consuming thing. The sleepless nights, the endless diapers, the undying love, the absurd tasks that must be performed to ease a baby into nap time. But time and energy aren’t the only casualties of motherhood. In our culture, motherhood often demands one’s identity as well, consumes it whole as the woman becomes a public object for fawning over, for scrutinizing, for judging whether she measures up.

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What We Lost: Undoing the Fairy Tale Narrative of Adoption

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The singular, unavoidable truth about adoption is that it requires the undoing of one family so that another one can come into being. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Carolyn Parkhurst

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Carolyn Parkhurst discusses her latest book, Harmony, writing about your personal life and family in fiction, and her fascination with cults. ...more

FUNNY WOMEN #144: Food Reviews by Third Grader

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This refined combination will transport taste buds into a state of euphoria matched only when capturing a rare Mewtwo on Pokémon Go. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with David Rivard

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David Rivard discusses his new collection Standoff, writing as both a public and private act, the interiority of reading, and Pokémon GO. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Interview with Ramona Ausubel

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I find tremendous hope in the act of storytelling—the way we can redirect energy, to reclaim history, to build back lives that have been otherwise upset. ...more

Past the Break

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Past the break lies motherhood as I understand it: the rawest life that lifts and falls and crashes against beauty, and the eternal potential for heartbreak. ...more

Thanks, Alopecia Universalis

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Someday, will it be not myself but my daughter that I hold?

At Lit Hub, Helen Phillips, author of The Beautiful Bureaucrat and the newly released Some Possible Solutions, writes about parenting while (overly?) conscious of the critical eye, self-projected or otherwise, and finding moments of respite in the wonderful entropy of it all.

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The Rumpus Interview with Asali Solomon

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Asali Solomon discusses her debut novel, Disgruntled, narrative structure, the mythology of memory and place, and returning to Philadelphia after years away. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Anne Enright

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Anne Enright, author of, most recently, the novel The Green Road, talks with Elizabeth Isadora Gold about motherhood in reality and in fiction, and writing beyond labels and easy definitions. ...more

This Week of Short Fiction

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New motherhood: it’s common but totally strange, completely natural yet weirdly alien, a beautiful miracle and absolutely disgusting. It can also have some strong effects on a woman’s perception of self and identity, as Helen Phillips (The Beautiful Bureaucrat) explores brilliantly in her story “The Doppelgängers,” chosen by Lauren Groff at Recommended Reading this week.

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Voices on Addiction: Baby’s Home

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I got to thinking about home. What the fuck is home anyway? ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Zoe Zolbrod

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Zoe Zolbrod about her new book The Telling, pushing against victim narratives, how the conversation surrounding sexual abuse has evolved, and the melding of research with memoir. ...more

YA Novels Help Parents Talk Sex

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A discussion with your kid about the birds and the bees might be one of the more intimidating moments of parenthood, but YA novelists can lend a hand. When YA writers confront modern issues of sex, rape, consent, abuse, and gender, they help parents—and schools—introduce these sensitive topics:

Consent doesn’t even have to be about sex, per se, says Earl Sewell, who has written several young adult novels, including one where a boy pressures a girl to send explicit photos after they start sexting.

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Difficult Decisions

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She was fed exclusively through a gastrostomy tube. Although she couldn’t speak, she often smiled and made noises and expressed pleasure in the company of her siblings. Her parents — worried that their daughter’s continued growth would restrict her ability to join family trips, swing in the backyard, take baths or cuddle in their arms — formed a plan with Gunther to limit her adult stature.

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The Rumpus Interview with Meghan Daum and Elliott Holt

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Meghan Daum, the anthology's editor, and Elliott Holt, who contributed its penultimate essay, discuss Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed. ...more