Posts Tagged: Poem of the Day

Poem of the Day: “Sound & Fury” by Claudia Rankine

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Claudia Rankine is an oracle. Her poetry is beautiful, interrogative, and inventive, as seen in Don’t Let Me Be Lonely and Citizen (the American lyric we need for a path forward). Her consideration and public consciousness is nothing less than illuminating, and necessary in these dire times mercilessly lacking in empathy.

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Poem of the Day: “Burial Practice” by Srikanth Reddy

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Srikanth Reddy’s Facts for Visitors, from which this poem is from, came out in 2004; it has beautiful and inventive poems which Reddy has continued to produce since then in books like Voyager (which is a book of erasure made from Kurt Waldheim’s memoir, In the Eye of the Storm).

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Poem of the Day: “An American Poem” by Eileen Myles

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Eileen Myles has been a badass writer for a while now; she tears down what needs be torn down, unapologetically, and fosters a communal feeling, inspiring others to do the same. During the time this poem was published in Not Me, Myles famously ran for president in a write-in campaign—and for many, Maggie Nelson among them, Myles is absolutely our president.

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Poem of the Day: “At Night the States” by Alice Notley

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“At Night the States” is a famous poem that, whether you have or haven’t heard it before, strikes you over the head repeatedly. Formally inventive without any loss in the depth of its feeling, Notley transcends the genre of elegy to an expression of grief that might register unmediated: it is a present poem, an immediate poem, an inconsolable poem.

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Poem of the Day: “What Kind of Times Are These” by Adrienne Rich

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This year saw Adrienne Rich’s poems released into a collected edition by Norton, and some really great new articles written about her. Though she passed away in 2012, it’s safe to say that she remains a presence, will always remain a presence, in American writing.

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Poem of the Day: “Social Skills Training” by Solmaz Sharif

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Solmaz Sharif’s poems show an extremely agile and adept blending of the personal and the political such that they cannot be pulled apart. Because they cannot be pulled apart. Her first book, Look, published by Graywolf, is one of this year’s most exciting new collections: it bleeds language for what it’s done to us and what we’ve done to it, to each other.

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