Posts Tagged: prison

etheridgeknight_newbioimage

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 1): “The Idea of Ancestry”

By

I know / their dark eyes, they know mine. ...more

Revisiting Attica

By

If you’ve been reading about the nationwide prisoner strike, perhaps pick up Heather Ann Thompson’s Blood in the Water. The recently released nonfiction title returns readers to the Attica Prison riots. It, “reminds one generation, and informs others,” that New York state’s handling of Attica “remains one of the bleakest, if least acknowledged, chapters in New York history” due to it’s unwillingness to reckon with how victims were treated as well as the continual existence of prison conditions in the age of further mass incarceration.

...more

Megha Majumdar

The Read Along #3: Megha Majumdar

By

Megha Majumdar on Russian spies, child-sized newspapers, and why reading difficult fiction can invigorate, rather than depress. ...more

Panthers in the Hole feature

Spotlight: The Rumpus Review of Panthers in the Hole

By

Brandon Hicks reviews Panthers in the Hole, a new graphic novel from by Bruce and David Cénou. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

Livraria Folha Seca in Rio de Janeiro was told that a sign about two-time medalist Adhemar Ferreira Silva, who passed away in 2001, violated the Olympic Committee’s advertising policies.

Reuters attempts to answer why millennials love buying books.

Inmates from Two Bridges Jail are helping the Wiscasset, Maine public library build bookshelves for a used bookstore.

...more

additional author photo

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Idra Novey

By

Swati Khurana talks with novelist and translator Idra Novey about the challenges and joys of translation, the idiosyncrasies of language, the inextricable reception of women's writing and women's bodies, and much more. ...more

Smith, Cote (c) Mick Cottin

The Rumpus Interview with Cote Smith

By

Cote Smith talks about his debut novel, Hurt People, growing up in a prison town, using rejection as motivation, and brotherly love. ...more

LGBTQ Lives and the Prison System

By

At the New Yorker, Grace Dunham discusses the importance of Captive Genders, an anthology about the oft-forgotten impact of the prison industrial complex on trans and queer people, recently released in its second edition:

The book brings together the work of activists, artists, and academics, many of whom are current or former prisoners; it challenges hierarchies of expertise, presenting recollection, poetry, and theory as equally legitimate mediums for political critique.

...more

vickie2

Conversations with Literary Ex-Cons #9: Vickie Stringer

By

Vickie Stringer talks about her first novel Let That Be the Reason, her Triple Crown Publishing venture, life in prison, and making hip-hop literature. ...more

49fa001ddf3ae3220b94d6cc4978e47789e5bbee

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Making a Murderer and “Bad” Families

By

There were “good” families and “bad” families, and even I, an outsider, was quickly apprised of which was which. ...more

On Refugees, and Refusing to Be Scared

By

The news that governors are suddenly deciding that they don’t want to welcome Syrian refugees has really driven home to me just how cowardly much of this country is. We talk tough, mind you, but when we’re asked to really open ourselves up to something, we refuse.

...more

Reginald Dwayne Betts

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Reginald Dwayne Betts

By

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Reginald Dwayne Betts about his new book Bastards of the Reagan Era. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

New York City bookstore The Strand has started selling “Make America Read Again” hats that mock The Donald’s campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again.”

Toledo-area bookstore J’s Book Shelf is helping local inmates get access to reading material, donating 22,000 books.

...more

Adam Johnson - Credit Samson Yee

The Rumpus Interview with Adam Johnson

By

Pulitzer Prize–winning author Adam Johnson talks about his new book, Fortune Smiles, fiction and voice, veterans and defectors, solar-powered robots and self-driving cars, and infrared baseball caps that can blind security cameras. ...more

Imperiled Across Both the Deep and Immediate Past

By

At the Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates unflinchingly analyzes and condemns the history of mass incarceration in America and its disproportionately devastating effect on black families:

The blacks incarcerated in this country are not like the majority of Americans. They do not merely hail from poor communities—they hail from communities that have been imperiled across both the deep and immediate past, and continue to be imperiled today.

...more

Books That Save Lives

By

For the GuardianErwin James reflects on his experience reading while in prison, and how books like David Levering’s Prisoners of Honor reshaped his life:

I was without skills or abilities, but I could read. I’m sure the six books a week I was allowed from the prison library helped to keep me alive during that uncertain year, unlike the man in the cell above mine who hanged himself during my first Christmas inside.

...more

Moshfegh author phot credit Krystal Griffiths

The Rumpus Interview with Ottessa Moshfegh

By

Ottessa Moshfegh discusses her first full-length novel, Eileen, betrayal, self-aware narrators, and the catalytic properties of friendship. ...more

Untitled1

Conversations with Literary Ex-Cons #8: Jack Gantos

By

Jack Gantos discusses the sense of “delusional invincibility” he had in 1970s New York that led him to prison—and then on to a career as an award-winning children’s book author. ...more

Writing in Prison

By

Drugs and petty crime landed Daniel Genis in prison for ten years. He spent his term reading and working on his three-hundred page novel—but only after dropping $375 on a clear plastic typewriter, the only model he was allowed. Genis spoke with The Airship, describing what it was like writing from prison:

A typewriter contains enough metal rods and plastic shards to murder a fair amount of people, so one would think that this would be an issue.

...more