Posts Tagged: Publishers Weekly

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #95: Gabe Habash

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Gabe Habash’s Stephen Florida is a three-hundred page manic unraveling of the titular Stephen’s psyche, told over the course of one season of collegiate wrestling. In the opening pages, Stephen states his intentions in no ambiguous terms: he is going to win the NCAA Division Four wrestling championship. The novel is the fast-paced story of […]

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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The Wild Rumpus (no relation), a children’s bookstore in Minneapolis, was named the bookstore of the year by Publishers Weekly. Minneapolis is also the third most literate city in the US, taking into account the number of bookstores per capita. Unrelated, its also the fourth city for garden gnome appreciation.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Revolution Books in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood is exploiting Trump’s election to raise money for a fight against fascism. People in Japan value neighborhood bookstores so much that local governments are opening government-run stores in an effort to keep community spaces flourishing. A fascist bookstore in Florence, Italy received a special delivery—a bomb. The […]

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Profitable Poetry

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Rupi Kaur’s poetry collection, Milk and Honey, has sold almost half a million copies since its publication by Andrews McMeel Publishing last year, according to Anisse Gross in Publishers Weekly. While that is the company’s best selling poetry collection, it isn’t the only one that’s sold well: “We saw that there was this generation of young […]

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A Safe Harbor

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Book clubs have long been a mainstay in literary and bookish circles. Claire Kirch, writing for Publisher’s Weekly, takes a look at how some indie bookstores have leveraged this to increase sales—thereby helping to ensure they will stay open to serve said book clubs, as well as other book-lovers. And while we’re talking book clubs, be […]

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The Literary Hustle

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Even after authors finish writing their book, they have plenty of work to do to promote it. With so many books and limited space in media outlets, the literary hustle is a major part of any book launch. Over at Publishers Weekly, Camille Perri looks at the challenges and subjectivity of book coverage: I also […]

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We Need Diverse Publishers

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According to Publishers Weekly, publishing is so white because publishers—particularly the Big Five—have failed to implement concrete plans to diversify their hires. One publishing HR exec said that even though hiring quotas are risky and make people uncomfortable, an alternate plan is to do outreach through organizations like the Asian American Writers’ Workshop and We […]

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No More Book Shaming

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It’s no secret that libraries have had a rocky relationship with publishers since the ebook boom began in the late aughts. Publisher’s Weekly suggests three ways the two could work to heal the rift, but one of the suggestions is surprising: librarians need to stop “book shaming”: What today’s library elite seems to forget is […]

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A Look Back at Amazon’s Twenty Years

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Publisher’s Weekly has a retrospective on Amazon.com’s 20 years of selling books, DVDs, electronics, and everything else. The article cites the introduction of the Kindle and the Kindle e-bookstore as Amazon’s most important innovation, but is quick to cite the company’s other advances—as well as the many controversies sparked by said advances. For example, before it […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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You can count on One Story as a sort of literary sieve, distilling story-sized servings of up-and-coming writers we should know, and soon enough will know, if we don’t know them already. Next week, One Story will host its annual Literary Debutante Ball, a party thrown in honor of those who’ve published stories with them and […]

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The FBI’s James Baldwin Obsession

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Writing for Publishers Weekly, William J. Maxwell examines the 1,884-page FBI file on James Baldwin—the longest on record—as part of his effort to obtain surveillance information on African American authors through the Freedom of Information Act. Along with reports on literary giants like Lorraine Hansberry and Amiri Baraka, Baldwin’s file reveals a complex relationship between […]

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From Papyrus to PDF

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Mike Kelley delivers a useful overview of the outlook for preservation of e-books for Publishers Weekly. In addition to the upkeep necessary to combat digital decay, which is at least analogous to the challenges of paper-book preservation, libraries are now confronting the particular difficulties of texts in proprietary file formats, with limited licenses, and without […]

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Evaluating Books One Pie Chart at A Time

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Sometimes exegesis of a literary text just isn’t colorful enough. That’s when you break out the pie charts. Publishers Weekly‘s news blog, PWxyz, has an ongoing feature that slices canonical works of fiction into easily understandable visual representations of data. The latest book on the cutting board is Saul Bellow’s The Adventures of Augie March. “Identity” takes […]

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Claire Messud on making friends with Characters

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Annasue McCleave from Publishers Weekly suggested during an interview with Claire Messud, “I wouldn’t want to be friends” with Nora, the fiery protagonist in Messud’s new novel, The Woman Upstairs. “[Nora’s] outlook is almost unbearably grim,” continues McCleave. Messud shot back: For heaven’s sake, what kind of question is that? Would you want to be friends with Humbert Humbert? Would you […]

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Segura Returns to PW!

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Former Publishers Weekly deputy reviews editor Jonny Segura will return to the magazine in the new position of senior editor, digital media. On April 16th, Segura will take over responsibility “for the editorial quality of PW‘s online presentation.” (Via You Rach You Lose)

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Tumbling Publishing

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Exploring how and why publishers are using Tumblr to grow an online presence, Publisher’s Weekly converses with Rachel Fershleiser, who does literary strategic outreach for the microblogging company. “Branding is an online capability; you can give readers a real sense of what sets your books apart. Tumblr provides an opportunity to speak directly to readers […]

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Praise for Wild

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“Her account forms a charming, intrepid trial by fire, as she emerges from the ordeal bruised but not beaten, changed, a lone survivor.” Publishers Weekly reviews Rumpus contributor Cheryl Strayed’s Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail.

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New Self-publishing Service

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Book Country, an online community created by Penguin this past spring, has announced the addition of a self-publishing component. Here’s an explanation of how it works. “BC offers three publishing “packages” at three prices: $549 for the professionally formatted print/e-book package; $299 for the user-formatted print/e-book package; and $99 for the e-book only package. Each […]

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Love and Shame and Love Review

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Publisher’s Weekly reviews our November Book Club pick, Love and Shame and Love, by Peter Orner (whose Rumpus column you can read here). “Two themes—sometimes comic, often rueful—intersect throughout: the secret shames, frustrations, and humiliations that each character endures, and the search for love that blossoms and then fails in each generation. A richly layered, […]

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YA Characters “Straightened”

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Two co-authors of a post-apocalyptic young adult novel discuss how they were offered representation on the condition that they remove or straighten a gay character. “The conversation made it clear that the agent thought our book would be an easy sale if we just made that change. But it doesn’t matter if the agent rejected […]

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Tragic Literary Ends

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Publisher’s Weekly is attempting to deconstruct that fateful link between writers and tragic deaths through the anecdotal ends of some of the literary greats. Tennessee Williams choked on a bottle cap, Sir Francis Bacon got a fatal case of pneumonia after stuffing a chicken with snow during a blizzard—there is a trove of death-themed stories […]

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