Posts Tagged: queer

This Week In Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of the truth.

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This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most relevant content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of the truth.

...more

This Week in Books: These Wild Houses

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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The Future of Body Horror: Can Our Art Keep up with Our Suffering?

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The individuality of body horror is its signature attribute. Nothing is more intimate than one’s own body, and by extension, one’s own physical suffering. ...more

On Self-Reliance: Frank Ocean as Emersonian Hero

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As Emerson recognizes, someone who couldn’t care less about how they come across is all the more charismatic and convincing. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Lucy Jane Bledsoe

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Lucy Jane Bledsoe discusses her latest book, A Thin Bright Line, uncovering the remarkable story of her aunt, and illuminating history through the lens of imagination. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Dawn Lundy Martin

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Dawn Lundy Martin discusses her most recent collection, Life in a Box is a Pretty Life, the intersections between poetry and social justice, her wide variety of inspirations, and bathroom gender binaries. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Stacy Szymaszek

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Poet Stacy Szymaszek discusses her most recent collection, Journal of Ugly Sites & Other Journals, the "notebook genre," and claiming a city—ugly sites and all. ...more

This Week in Trumplandia

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trumplandia

Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent and relevant content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of the truth.

...more

Fitting Characters and Scripts

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Unwittingly, my mother teaches me in this conversation her generation’s word for gay: 同性恋. I look it up in an online dictionary, three characters in my mother’s tongue. Same, sex, and love. ...more

Damned and Damaged Vessels

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I envisioned a new science fiction canon, one in which I was a cyborg, fashioning my body into something new. ...more

A Letter to My Male Friends Who May Not Know That They Are Women

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Dearest loves,

As you are, I am stricken. I am devastated. I am unmade.

We have all felt a terrible blow. And yet, of course, we all feel it differently, and have different understandings of what has befallen us, and what is to come.

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What We Lost: Undoing the Fairy Tale Narrative of Adoption

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The singular, unavoidable truth about adoption is that it requires the undoing of one family so that another one can come into being. ...more

Queering the Canon

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For VICE, Lindsay King-Miller examines the literary tradition of retelling and reworking classic stories and the importance of bringing queer arcs in particular to our old standbys:

Revisiting a story gives us an opportunity to explore universal experiences from the perspective of those who weren’t represented in the original, and nowhere is this more apparent than in today’s generation of young writers and artists bringing overt queerness into the literary canon.

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Happy Butch Halloween

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When you are a queer kid, there are so many things people tell you are bad.

In an autobiographical comic at Catapult, liz rosema tackles the topic of Halloween as it pertains to queer youth. Queer children, in particular, are often told many things are bad, but rosema proposes there is a specific value in Halloween for such children, in that it lets us become the ‘bad things,’ without punishment.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jonathan Corcoran

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Jonathan Corcoran discusses his debut collection The Rope Swing, Appalachian writing communities, getting disowned by his family for coming out, and his father's death. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Saleem Haddad

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Saleem Haddad discusses his debut novel Guapa, the Orlando shootings, the importance of queer spaces, and Arab literature. ...more

Are You a Trans Ally?

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Often well-intentioned cis folks like myself feel kind of overwhelmed by all there is to know and, not wanting to sound ignorant or hurtful, just kind of keep to the sidelines. But it doesn’t take a degree in gender studies to be a trans ally (nor does it require you to have an LGBTQ friend).

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Notes from the Underground

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For Hazlitt, Hugh Ryan attempts to document the many personas of mid-1900s drag performer Malvina Schwartz, bringing color to the landmarks and styles of a queer world that sometimes threatens to be forgotten. Ultimately his work illustrates the piecemeal nature of queer historiography and the intermittently rewarding and disheartening detective work of pursuing these stories:

The history of that recording is a microcosm for queer history itself: fragmented, discontinuous, and surprising to the modern ear.

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When Marketing Trumps Truth

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This is how gay-male-identifying, biological women become straight chicks. Investigative journalism morphs into emotional memoir. ...more

Fear and Loathing

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For Lambda Literary, Christopher Soto talks with Brenda Shaughnessy about her new collection of poetry and how she relates to her writing as someone who is already four collections in. She outlines the ways in which her work has been shaped by embarrassment, her experiences within the queer community, and the importance of a writer unselfconsciously leaving herself open to new things:

But I found that I could use my embarrassment against itself: a new kind of fuck-you to an inner critic I hadn’t realized I’d been listening to my whole life.

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A Convergence of Selves

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In an illuminating interview with Claire Schwartz for Guernica, writer Kai Cheng Thom discusses activism, the unique intersections felt by people of color in the queer community, consensual behavior, trauma, and the immigrant experience. It’s a lot of ground to cover, and in doing so she reveals the convergence of all these areas of concern into a singular identity she’s had to construct for herself:

When you begin to define yourself as a queer person of color (qpoc) and transgender or transsexual and of color, you have to, in a sense, give birth to that.

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The Queer History of Children Books

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Over at the Los Angeles Review of Books, Kelly Blewett retraces a fragment of the long-needed queer history of children books:

Nordstrom was also queer. Although it seems she rarely mixed her private life with her professional one, a number of the most famous writers whom she published were queer, too, including Brown, Fitzhugh, and Sendak.

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Visible: Women Writers of Color #4: Jaquira Díaz

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Jaquira Díaz discusses the challenge of writing about family members, her greatest joy as a writer, and her literary role models. ...more

(K)ink #10: Writing While Deviant: Amber Dawn

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What do we as writers tell each other about the intersections of trauma and desire? How do we encourage (or discourage) each other to reveal the power and tensions in those margins? ...more