Posts Tagged: Ralph Ellison

Reading Other People’s Mail: Talking with Michelle Dean

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Michelle Dean discusses Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion, literary legends, and the absence of Black writers from the narrative.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #84: Susan DeFreitas

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Picture this: a curbside juggler with a rose between his teeth. That’s the opening image of Susan DeFreitas’s powerful debut novel, Hot Season. Vivid (and sometimes strange) images strike again and again, conjuring ponderosa pines, cafés, old houses, and new characters. The book is firmly set in the fictional town of Crest Top, Arizona, and […]

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Harlem Is Nowhere

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A new exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago takes visitors through the collaborative efforts of writer Ralph Ellison and photographer Gordon Parks: In some ways, their collaboration is akin to a great songwriting duo… One handles the music, the other lyrics, and there’s never something that comes completely first. They understood that the sum […]

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Desiree Cooper

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Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told.

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #22: Classic Novels That Are a Joy to Read

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Sometimes we bypass the classic novels on the way to the rich offering of current literary fiction. Fair enough; there is so much to love in today’s fiction. But once in a while, dust off a classic gem and consider the language, the depth, the metaphorical heft these books carry—along with being engrossing, powerful reads. Reading […]

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Invisible Man Gets A Little More Invisible

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The Raw Story’s Arturo Garcia reports that Ralph Ellison’s novel Invisible Man has been banned from school libraries and reading lists in Randolph County, North Carolina. After a parent decried the book as “not so innocent,” the school board voted 5–2 to ban it, declaring it “a hard read” without “any literary value.” How wonderful that […]

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Harlem Blues

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Between 1915 and 1970, six million African-Americans left the oppression of the Jim Crow South to find freedom in California and the northern states. Most traveled by rail, with those in the Southeast taking the Seaboard Air Line up the East Coast to Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, and New York. The most popular destination for southern […]

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