Posts Tagged: Rare books

Sound & Vision: Arthur Fournier

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Allyson McCabe talks with Arthur Fournier, an independent dealer of books, serials, manuscripts, and archives, about how he developed his niche, and how digital access has both enriched and complicated the work of archiving and collecting. ...more

Book Thief Stabs British Collector for The Wind in the Willows

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The rare book business turned deadly for a British book dealer, who was stabbed and killed for his first-edition copy of The Wind in the Willows (worth about $64,000) in April, Michael Schaub reports at the Los Angeles Times. The suspect, in calculating crime novel fashion, was planning a robbing-spree among more celebrities and keepers of rare goodies, keeping details of his plans in an Excel spreadsheet.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Monkey’s Paw in Toronto sells random books from a biblio-mat machine.

A manhunt is on for a thief who stole two rare books in New York City.

The last bookstore in Peshawar, Pakistan is closing.

A Dallas, Texas bookstore is tricking people into buying books by making them sound like clickbait.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Chicago’s Wicker Park has been gentrifying, but Quimby’s, a quirky indie bookstore, remains a haven for alt lit.

Amazon probably doesn’t care whether customers buy anything from its physical stores.

The New Yorker takes a look at why China is cracking down on dissidents, including Hong Kong booksellers that disappeared late last year.

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Learning to Work with Rare Books

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In 1983, Terry Belanger created a curriculum for librarians to learn how to deal with rare books at Columbia University. Nine years later, the University of Virginia hired him and the Rare Book School moved to Charlottesville. The school now has 80,000 rare volumes and runs highly competitive five-day session where students are taught the ins and outs of rare books.

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Go to the Library Without Leaving Your House

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Italian Librarian Steals and Deals Rare Books

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Who says librarians can’t also be the leaders of organized crime rings?

The very man charged with protecting these treasures, Marino Massimo De Caro, a politically connected former director of the library, is accused of being at the center of a network of middlemen, book dealers and possibly crooked conservators — all part of what prosecutors say is a sometimes corrupt market for rare books…

The New York Times has more, including the best final paragraph you’ll read all week.

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