Posts Tagged: Roald Dahl

The Experience Takes Its Shape from You: Talking with Naima Coster

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Naima Coster discusses her debut novel, Halsey Street, getting pushback on her use of Spanish, and the importance of equity and inclusion in higher education.

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Writer, Storyteller, Pilot, Spy

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Though he fled the country as soon as possible, the writer would maintain an affection for Canada that lasted throughout his life. Over at The Walrus, Michael Hingston explores Roald Dahl’s time at Camp X—a World War II army base in Canada for the British Security Coordination, a covert intelligence organization. Dahl was sent there […]

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It’s Scrumdiddlyumptious

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The Oxford English Dictionary is doing its part to celebrate Roald Dahl’s 100th birthday by including some of his most memorable made-up words in the new edition, according to the Guardian: Michael Proffitt, chief editor of the OED, said: “The inclusion in OED of a number of words coined by or associated with Roald Dahl reflects […]

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Roald Dahl’s Hidden Village Home

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Take a stroll through the storybook town of Great Missenden, a tiny village in the county of Buckinghamshire in Britain, and the home of children’s literature’s grand-wizard, Roald Dahl, in the latter half of his life. For Hazlitt, Michael Hingston tours Great Missenden and reflects on the similarities between the little town and the settings […]

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Tinker, Tailor, Novelist, Spy

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It is not so surprising that so many writers have worked in intelligence. Writers create plots; spies uncover them. In a sense, all writers function like spies—observing the people around them, studying character types, becoming flies-on-the-wall for the purpose of their art. Successful writers from Christopher Marlowe to Roald Dahl have led parallel careers in […]

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Kloss, Kish, and the Great White Whale

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Roald Dahl and Quentin Blake aside, it’s hard to imagine a more mutualistic artist-writer pair than Robert Kloss and Matt Kish. (The Rumpus also recommends the duo of Casey Scieszka and Steven Weinberg.) Kloss and Kish (who also illustrated every page of Moby Dick) have never met, but they still manage to talk about landscapes […]

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I’ll Have an Everlasting Gobstopper With My Big Mac, Please

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Young British bibliophiles may have found the Golden Ticket. In a six-week campaign backed by the National Literacy Trust (NLT), McDonald’s will offer chapters from Roald Dahl’s books with its Happy Meals. The Rumpus would choose Matilda over a Lego toy any day—especially when 15.4% of British kids don’t have a book of their own, […]

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Why Matilda Got Her Measles Shot

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Since much of the rhetoric around recent outbreaks of the measles revolves around concern for the well-being of children, perhaps the strongest advocate to answer our concerns is a beloved author of children’s literature. The Guardian shares an emotional letter from Roald Dahl, who lost his seven-year-old daughter Olivia to the disease at a time […]

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Author Roboto

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At Melville House, Liam O’Brien delves into the fictional and factual history of book-writing computers, from Roald Dahl’s “The Great Automatic Grammatizator” to the Russian computer that rewrote Anna Karenina in the style of Murakami. With some media outlets already using bots to pen articles, he wonders if the robots will be coming for literature […]

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After 1984, There Was 1983

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Think of the year 1984 and your mind can’t help but jump to great books, thanks to George Orwell’s dystopic classic. But what about 1983? To put some sparkle back in 1983’s literary eye, the AV Club rounded up ten of the year’s excellent but underappreciated books. It’s true: despite being praiseworthy books by big-name […]

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Hitchcock’s “Man from the South”

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There are lots of things to be happy about today. For instance, Open Culture unearthed Alfred Hitchcock’s adaptation of Roald Dahl’s dark short story “Man from the South” starring a young Steve McQueen who makes a wager for a convertible. Also starring a hatchet and several severed pinky fingers. Alfred Hitchcock Presents ran from 1955 […]

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Literary Fashionables: The Showman and The Muse

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Two further reasons to drop your day job and write full time rather than watch all this literary glamor ringside are Jonathan Ames and Sophie Dahl. Unless, of course, you don’t have a hit show on HBO, Dave Letterman calling you for repeat visits, Mick Jagger at your heels, or the legacy of a literary […]

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